Water spark plug replication.

phil

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #25, on March 2nd, 2012, 02:56 PM »
Heres a video of Herman Anderson who had a car running from a water sparkplug

https://vimeo.com/37306772

~Russ

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #26, on March 6th, 2012, 02:47 AM »Last edited on March 6th, 2012, 02:51 AM by ~Russ/Rwg42985
Quote from phil on March 2nd, 2012, 02:56 PM
Heres a video of Herman Anderson who had a car running from a water sparkplug

https://vimeo.com/37306772
nice find... very interesting... :) thanks Phil

sounds like he is just producing  Orthohydrogen? this boosted his results X2 by making the H twice as dense?
~Russ

securesupplies

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #27, on March 7th, 2012, 10:35 AM »
Hi this one is from 1976 and should be noted as prior to stan!!
Patent •   US 3,946,711
look up google patents •   US 3,946,711
RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #28, on March 16th, 2012, 12:55 PM »Last edited on March 16th, 2012, 01:00 PM by securesupplies
Check this out , I feel alot of work should be donw in this area asap to
trail and find the best model to hack .

http://www.woodward.com/aircraftturbineigniter.aspx

champian and several candian aircraft ignitor brands have these
see attached

Dan
:idea::D
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1tl6X5D8L4Z61AOFxnCg0YeFEtrOvhgqVKcly2DTXa4Q/edit

Use in aircraft

Water injection has been used in both reciprocating and turbine aircraft engines. When used in a turbine engine, the effects are similar, except that preventing detonation is not the primary goal. Water is normally injected either at the compressor inlet or in the diffuser just before the combustion chambers. Adding water increases the mass being accelerated out of the engine, increasing thrust, but it also serves to cool the turbines. Since temperature is normally the limiting factor in turbine engine performance at low altitudes, the cooling effect allows the engines to be run at a higher RPM with more fuel injected and more thrust created without overheating.[3] The drawback of the system is that injecting water quenches the flame in the combustion chambers somewhat, as there is no way to cool the engine parts without cooling the flame accidentally. This leads to unburned fuel out the exhaust and a characteristic trail of black smoke.
Piston engined petrol military aircraft utilized water injection technology prior to World War II in order to increase takeoff power. This was used so that heavily-laden fighters could take off from shorter runways, climb faster, and quickly reach high altitudes to intercept enemy bomber formations. Some fighter aircraft also used water injection to allow higher boost in short bursts during dogfights.
As a general rule, the fuel mixture is set at full rich on an aircraft engine when running it at a high power settings (such as during takeoff). The extra fuel does not burn; its only purpose is to evaporate to absorb heat. This uses up more fuel, and it also decreases the efficiency of the combustion process. By using water injection, the cooling effect of the water allows the fuel mixture to be run leaner at its best-power setting. Many military aircraft engines of the 1940s utilized a pressure carburetor, a type of fuel metering system similar to a throttle body injection system. In a water-injected engine, the pressure carburetor features a mechanical derichment valve which makes the system nearly automatic. When the pilot turns on the water injection pump, water pressure moves the derichment valve to restrict fuel flow to lean the mixture while at the same time mixing the water/methanol fluid in to the system. When the system runs out of fluid the derichment valve shuts and cuts off the water injection system, while enriching the fuel mixture to provide a cooling quench to prevent sudden detonation.
Due to the cooling effect of the water, aircraft engines can run at much higher manifold pressures without detonating, creating more power. This is the primary advantage of a water injection system when used on an aircraft engine.
The extra weight and complexity added by a water injection system was considered worthwhile for military purposes, while it is usually not considered worthwhile for civil use. The one exception is racing aircraft, which are focused on making a tremendous amount of power for a short time; in this case the disadvantages of a water injection system are less important.
The use of water injection in turbine engines has been limited, again, mostly to military aircraft. Many pictures are available of Boeing B-52 takeoffs which clearly show the black smoke emitted by turbine engines running with water injection. For early B-52s, water injection was seen as a vital part of take-off procedures. For later versions of the B-52 as well as later turbine-powered bombers, the problem of taking off heavily loaded from short runways was solved by the availability of more powerful engines that had not been available previously.
The BAC One-Eleven airliner also used water injection for its Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan engines. Filling the tanks with jet fuel instead of water lead to the Paninternational Flight 112 crash.[4]
[edit]Use in automobiles

A limited number of road vehicles with large-displacement engines from manufacturers such as Chrysler have included water injection. The 1962 Oldsmobile F85 was delivered with the Fluid-Injection Jetfire[5] engine, which was incidentally the world's first turbocharged road car. Oldsmobile referred to the water/alcohol mixture as 'Turbo-Rocket Fluid'. Saab offered water injection for the Saab 99 Turbo. With the introduction of the intercooler the interest in water injection disappeared, but today, water injection is also of interest because it can potentially decrease nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions in exhaust. The most common use of water injection today is in vehicles with aftermarket forced induction systems, such as turbochargers or superchargers. Such engines are commonly tuned with a narrower margin of safety from detonation and hence benefit greatly from the cooling effects of vaporized water.[citation needed]
[edit]See also

Crower six stroke
MW 50
RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #29, on March 16th, 2012, 09:18 PM »
OK Here it is

The Term is
Ignitor , flame rod or in liquid electrode
turbine igniters.  

 Auburn SI-346 is one example
used on Westinghouse turbines, all turbine igniters are made by either Unison or Champion Aero

Can start search for suitbale part numbers
here as have any options
http://www.steamshop.com/Auburn.htm

I attached a pic but ideal is we work togther to find the best part number option
to machine the add on.

PLease advise and post what you find in regards to suitable part number

Dan

Jeff Nading

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #30, on March 17th, 2012, 05:32 AM »Last edited on March 17th, 2012, 05:34 AM by Jeff Nading
Quote from securesupplies on March 16th, 2012, 12:55 PM
Check this out , I feel alot of work should be donw in this area asap to
trail and find the best model to hack .

http://www.woodward.com/aircraftturbineigniter.aspx

champian and several candian aircraft ignitor brands have these
see attached

Dan
:idea::D
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1tl6X5D8L4Z61AOFxnCg0YeFEtrOvhgqVKcly2DTXa4Q/edit


Use in aircraft

Water injection has been used in both reciprocating and turbine aircraft engines. When used in a turbine engine, the effects are similar, except that preventing detonation is not the primary goal. Water is normally injected either at the compressor inlet or in the diffuser just before the combustion chambers. Adding water increases the mass being accelerated out of the engine, increasing thrust, but it also serves to cool the turbines. Since temperature is normally the limiting factor in turbine engine performance at low altitudes, the cooling effect allows the engines to be run at a higher RPM with more fuel injected and more thrust created without overheating.[3] The drawback of the system is that injecting water quenches the flame in the combustion chambers somewhat, as there is no way to cool the engine parts without cooling the flame accidentally. This leads to unburned fuel out the exhaust and a characteristic trail of black smoke.
Piston engined petrol military aircraft utilized water injection technology prior to World War II in order to increase takeoff power. This was used so that heavily-laden fighters could take off from shorter runways, climb faster, and quickly reach high altitudes to intercept enemy bomber formations. Some fighter aircraft also used water injection to allow higher boost in short bursts during dogfights.
As a general rule, the fuel mixture is set at full rich on an aircraft engine when running it at a high power settings (such as during takeoff). The extra fuel does not burn; its only purpose is to evaporate to absorb heat. This uses up more fuel, and it also decreases the efficiency of the combustion process. By using water injection, the cooling effect of the water allows the fuel mixture to be run leaner at its best-power setting. Many military aircraft engines of the 1940s utilized a pressure carburetor, a type of fuel metering system similar to a throttle body injection system. In a water-injected engine, the pressure carburetor features a mechanical derichment valve which makes the system nearly automatic. When the pilot turns on the water injection pump, water pressure moves the derichment valve to restrict fuel flow to lean the mixture while at the same time mixing the water/methanol fluid in to the system. When the system runs out of fluid the derichment valve shuts and cuts off the water injection system, while enriching the fuel mixture to provide a cooling quench to prevent sudden detonation.
Due to the cooling effect of the water, aircraft engines can run at much higher manifold pressures without detonating, creating more power. This is the primary advantage of a water injection system when used on an aircraft engine.
The extra weight and complexity added by a water injection system was considered worthwhile for military purposes, while it is usually not considered worthwhile for civil use. The one exception is racing aircraft, which are focused on making a tremendous amount of power for a short time; in this case the disadvantages of a water injection system are less important.
The use of water injection in turbine engines has been limited, again, mostly to military aircraft. Many pictures are available of Boeing B-52 takeoffs which clearly show the black smoke emitted by turbine engines running with water injection. For early B-52s, water injection was seen as a vital part of take-off procedures. For later versions of the B-52 as well as later turbine-powered bombers, the problem of taking off heavily loaded from short runways was solved by the availability of more powerful engines that had not been available previously.
The BAC One-Eleven airliner also used water injection for its Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan engines. Filling the tanks with jet fuel instead of water lead to the Paninternational Flight 112 crash.[4]
[edit]Use in automobiles

A limited number of road vehicles with large-displacement engines from manufacturers such as Chrysler have included water injection. The 1962 Oldsmobile F85 was delivered with the Fluid-Injection Jetfire[5] engine, which was incidentally the world's first turbocharged road car. Oldsmobile referred to the water/alcohol mixture as 'Turbo-Rocket Fluid'. Saab offered water injection for the Saab 99 Turbo. With the introduction of the intercooler the interest in water injection disappeared, but today, water injection is also of interest because it can potentially decrease nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions in exhaust. The most common use of water injection today is in vehicles with aftermarket forced induction systems, such as turbochargers or superchargers. Such engines are commonly tuned with a narrower margin of safety from detonation and hence benefit greatly from the cooling effects of vaporized water.[citation needed]
[edit]See also

Crower six stroke
MW 50
I use to be an aircraft mechanic, the last photo 0n post #29 showing the cable, glow plug and spark plug were used on small reciprocating engine aircraft. The glow plug was used on Janatrol cabin heaters. Just a little tidbit.

securesupplies

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #31, on March 17th, 2012, 09:14 AM »Last edited on March 17th, 2012, 09:21 AM by securesupplies
Quote from Jeff Nading on March 17th, 2012, 05:32 AM
Quote from securesupplies on March 16th, 2012, 12:55 PM
Check this out , I feel alot of work should be donw in this area asap to
trail and find the best model to hack .

http://www.woodward.com/aircraftturbineigniter.aspx

champian and several candian aircraft ignitor brands have these
see attached

Dan
:idea::D
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1tl6X5D8L4Z61AOFxnCg0YeFEtrOvhgqVKcly2DTXa4Q/edit

Use in aircraft

Water injection has been used in both reciprocating and turbine aircraft engines. When used in a turbine engine, the effects are similar, except that preventing detonation is not the primary goal. Water is normally injected either at the compressor inlet or in the diffuser just before the combustion chambers. Adding water increases the mass being accelerated out of the engine, increasing thrust, but it also serves to cool the turbines. Since temperature is normally the limiting factor in turbine engine performance at low altitudes, the cooling effect allows the engines to be run at a higher RPM with more fuel injected and more thrust created without overheating.[3] The drawback of the system is that injecting water quenches the flame in the combustion chambers somewhat, as there is no way to cool the engine parts without cooling the flame accidentally. This leads to unburned fuel out the exhaust and a characteristic trail of black smoke.
Piston engined petrol military aircraft utilized water injection technology prior to World War II in order to increase takeoff power. This was used so that heavily-laden fighters could take off from shorter runways, climb faster, and quickly reach high altitudes to intercept enemy bomber formations. Some fighter aircraft also used water injection to allow higher boost in short bursts during dogfights.
As a general rule, the fuel mixture is set at full rich on an aircraft engine when running it at a high power settings (such as during takeoff). The extra fuel does not burn; its only purpose is to evaporate to absorb heat. This uses up more fuel, and it also decreases the efficiency of the combustion process. By using water injection, the cooling effect of the water allows the fuel mixture to be run leaner at its best-power setting. Many military aircraft engines of the 1940s utilized a pressure carburetor, a type of fuel metering system similar to a throttle body injection system. In a water-injected engine, the pressure carburetor features a mechanical derichment valve which makes the system nearly automatic. When the pilot turns on the water injection pump, water pressure moves the derichment valve to restrict fuel flow to lean the mixture while at the same time mixing the water/methanol fluid in to the system. When the system runs out of fluid the derichment valve shuts and cuts off the water injection system, while enriching the fuel mixture to provide a cooling quench to prevent sudden detonation.
Due to the cooling effect of the water, aircraft engines can run at much higher manifold pressures without detonating, creating more power. This is the primary advantage of a water injection system when used on an aircraft engine.
The extra weight and complexity added by a water injection system was considered worthwhile for military purposes, while it is usually not considered worthwhile for civil use. The one exception is racing aircraft, which are focused on making a tremendous amount of power for a short time; in this case the disadvantages of a water injection system are less important.
The use of water injection in turbine engines has been limited, again, mostly to military aircraft. Many pictures are available of Boeing B-52 takeoffs which clearly show the black smoke emitted by turbine engines running with water injection. For early B-52s, water injection was seen as a vital part of take-off procedures. For later versions of the B-52 as well as later turbine-powered bombers, the problem of taking off heavily loaded from short runways was solved by the availability of more powerful engines that had not been available previously.
The BAC One-Eleven airliner also used water injection for its Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan engines. Filling the tanks with jet fuel instead of water lead to the Paninternational Flight 112 crash.[4]
[edit]Use in automobiles

A limited number of road vehicles with large-displacement engines from manufacturers such as Chrysler have included water injection. The 1962 Oldsmobile F85 was delivered with the Fluid-Injection Jetfire[5] engine, which was incidentally the world's first turbocharged road car. Oldsmobile referred to the water/alcohol mixture as 'Turbo-Rocket Fluid'. Saab offered water injection for the Saab 99 Turbo. With the introduction of the intercooler the interest in water injection disappeared, but today, water injection is also of interest because it can potentially decrease nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions in exhaust. The most common use of water injection today is in vehicles with aftermarket forced induction systems, such as turbochargers or superchargers. Such engines are commonly tuned with a narrower margin of safety from detonation and hence benefit greatly from the cooling effects of vaporized water.[citation needed]
[edit]See also

Crower six stroke
MW 50
I use to be an aircraft mechanic, the last photo 0n post #29 showing the cable, glow plug and spark plug were used on small reciprocating engine aircraft. The glow plug was used on Janatrol cabin heaters. Just a little tidbit.
Thank you ,GREAT can you help , see from lists or reccomend from the parts  links to source ignitor or in liquid cathod  part which is long enough or suitable to be  inserted into a custom sleve we make , simply modified as Stan did with his, to make our own extension for our purposes  as stan did to fit over the ignitior, or flame rod? any extension we make would have thread on it to suit our own variety of engines, if you can help find this part number or suitable pc to start working on it you could help change the current adaption knowledge base  with the new knowledge soon after we will try it and set a standard guide for making them from off the shelf parts and coresponding manufacturer parts . the more who try the more we will learn how to and adapt the final solutions. Dan

It is important to note Stan mentioned "standard ignitor method" in his patent, and herman also used this form of technology for his car.

PLease help in the search maybe you have old ones laying around or can source some.  some people will have bucks of these and that is what we need

PLease take a few pictures of and post for research purpose to raise knowledge base up on it and modifying them.

As Some have fantastic casings etc that could be readily modified by screw on sleves for our purposes most are over spec which is good news.
with silver iridium and platinium.

please check the final set posting I made under
stan meyers injector, you may have more to add to the google doc there .

Dan


Jeff Nading

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #32, on March 17th, 2012, 01:08 PM »Last edited on March 18th, 2012, 02:52 PM by Jeff Nading
Dan I would say you could use this electrode linked here
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Auburn-I-10-25-Ignitor-Flame-Rod-Liquid-Level-Electrode-/110665478008#ht_3105wt_1059
 It can be used as a liquid level probe or a flame rod, igniter, the rod can be cut to fit an application. As for the sleeve, it only has to fit the threads of the igniter [female] and the threads of the sparkplug hole in the head of the engine [male], no mystery there, of course it would also have to have ports to inject different gases and such into it. Well I hope this will help in some small way.  

securesupplies

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #33, on March 20th, 2012, 08:25 AM »Last edited on March 20th, 2012, 08:28 AM by securesupplies
Now that is awesome

who is  going to be first to adapt that baby
PS Part number is

Auburn I-10-25
Ignitor Flame Rod Liquid Level Electrode

ps check this last post ,

telsa ignitor
http://open-source-energy.org/?tid=188&pid=3699#pid3699


note the part number every one,


better buy and post any sources part numbers you find

and attached

Daniel

scot

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #34, on March 21st, 2012, 03:41 PM »
Hi Artinvegas,
Would you be interested in drawing up what you wrote on the construction of the water spark plug and maybe some improvments if you have them.
I would be interested in duplicating that and then give it to whom ever is interested in experimenting with it, if thats ok.
Thanks, Scot

Jeff Nading

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #35, on March 22nd, 2012, 01:30 PM »
Quote from scot on March 21st, 2012, 03:41 PM
Hi Artinvegas,
Would you be interested in drawing up what you wrote on the construction of the water spark plug and maybe some improvments if you have them.
I would be interested in duplicating that and then give it to whom ever is interested in experimenting with it, if thats ok.
Thanks, Scot
I have a feeling art is not going to answer you Scot, he doesn't post much and from what I know of him he will not share info.:blush::angel:

scot

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #36, on March 22nd, 2012, 04:56 PM »
Ok Jeff thanks,
My question is do you think the water spark plug is really necessary. It seems to me it was the culmination of multiple systems in a highly sofisticated finished product that could be years beyond where we are now.
I'm looking at the water fuel cell as a fuel for a home generator. The trouble of dealing with drivability issues is huge so to me just making hho in larg quanities is what the main focus should be at first. I really like the idea that you guys are replicating Stan's stuff and not trying to do too much of your own thing. If i'm off let me know. Im thinking I could be better used in another area. But whatever tell me what to do and I'll do it. Thanks, Scot
RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #37, on March 22nd, 2012, 04:56 PM »
Ok Jeff thanks,
My question is do you think the water spark plug is really necessary. It seems to me it was the culmination of multiple systems in a highly sofisticated finished product that could be years beyond where we are now.
I'm looking at the water fuel cell as a fuel for a home generator. The trouble of dealing with drivability issues is huge so to me just making hho in larg quanities is what the main focus should be at first. I really like the idea that you guys are replicating Stan's stuff and not trying to do too much of your own thing. If i'm off let me know. Im thinking I could be better used in another area. But whatever tell me what to do and I'll do it. Thanks, Scot

Jeff Nading

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #38, on March 22nd, 2012, 08:24 PM »Last edited on March 22nd, 2012, 08:28 PM by Jeff Nading
Quote from scot on March 22nd, 2012, 04:56 PM
Ok Jeff thanks,
My question is do you think the water spark plug is really necessary. It seems to me it was the culmination of multiple systems in a highly sofisticated finished product that could be years beyond where we are now.
I'm looking at the water fuel cell as a fuel for a home generator. The trouble of dealing with drivability issues is huge so to me just making hho in larg quanities is what the main focus should be at first. I really like the idea that you guys are replicating Stan's stuff and not trying to do too much of your own thing. If i'm off let me know. Im thinking I could be better used in another area. But whatever tell me what to do and I'll do it. Thanks, Scot
Hi Scot, it's fine if you want to go another route, no problem at all:cool::P. I just thought it would be of help to us :blush: , the whole point of Stan's process was the end result,:D which was the water sparkplug :cool:. Stan said he could drive from coast to coast on 22 gallons of water.To, the reason for the sparkplug was to produce hho in the cylinder and not store it outside of the cylinder, [to dangerous] as the patent office required along with NASA.  All of the electronic's and other devices were to help the process along so the sparkplug could do it's work. No hho was stored at all, with his hho generator, he basically just leaned how to produce hydrogen and do it economically, then he built on that knowledge to produce the sparkplug, a stepping stone as it were. Well I should have not thrown the sparkplug burden on you like that and I am sorry, and I do hope you find something here you can sink your teeth into, Jeff.:D:D:P

~Russ

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #39, on March 23rd, 2012, 01:15 AM »
[/quote]I have a feeling art is not going to answer you Scot, he doesn't post much and from what I know of him he will not share info.:blush::angel:[/quote]art is under a disclosure agreement... thus the info he gives us is what he can... art's a good guy, but those agreements are nothing to mess around with! :)

~Russ

scot

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #40, on March 23rd, 2012, 04:38 PM »
Hi Jeff,
I think you just said what I said but it seems to me your a long shot off from needing the water spark plug.
But if you think your ready for it I will do my best to replicate it for you.
I think maybe you missunderstood I wasn't looking for another interest just something that might be needed more imediatly.
Thanks, Scot
RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #41, on March 23rd, 2012, 04:38 PM »
Hi Jeff,
I think you just said what I said but it seems to me your a long shot off from needing the water spark plug.
But if you think your ready for it I will do my best to replicate it for you.
I think maybe you missunderstood I wasn't looking for another interest just something that might be needed more imediatly.
Thanks, Scot

Jeff Nading

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #42, on March 23rd, 2012, 07:49 PM »
Quote from scot on March 23rd, 2012, 04:38 PM
Hi Jeff,
I think you just said what I said but it seems to me your a long shot off from needing the water spark plug.
But if you think your ready for it I will do my best to replicate it for you.
I think maybe you missunderstood I wasn't looking for another interest just something that might be needed more imediatly.
Thanks, Scot
Give us your opinion Russ, what do you want to see?:D

~Russ

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #43, on March 24th, 2012, 03:41 AM »
Quote from Jeff Nading on March 23rd, 2012, 07:49 PM
Quote from scot on March 23rd, 2012, 04:38 PM
Hi Jeff,
I think you just said what I said but it seems to me your a long shot off from needing the water spark plug.
But if you think your ready for it I will do my best to replicate it for you.
I think maybe you missunderstood I wasn't looking for another interest just something that might be needed more imediatly.
Thanks, Scot
Give us your opinion Russ, what do you want to see?:D
lol...

 people doing some good and doing it open source, people getting involved and taking it on for them self's, people helping others where they can instead of starting a war, everyone coming together for the better of the planet and not the better of them self's. man jeff... that's a Brod question lol...

on the topic....

scot, lets chat it out and see where it takes us. see where you may be of the most help in your skill set, i my self am most mechanically inclined over electronics... but i get buy and most of all with the help of others!

my Skype is RWG42985. add me to your Skype and lets chat it up. see where it may take us!

the help always needed, but most of all/most important, understanding the meyer system to its fullest! and most defiantly if your going for the "water spark plug"

Thanks guys!!! blessings my friends!

~Russ

Jeff Nading

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #44, on March 24th, 2012, 05:12 AM »
Quote from ~Russ/Rwg42985 on March 24th, 2012, 03:41 AM
Quote from Jeff Nading on March 23rd, 2012, 07:49 PM
Quote from scot on March 23rd, 2012, 04:38 PM
Hi Jeff,
I think you just said what I said but it seems to me your a long shot off from needing the water spark plug.
But if you think your ready for it I will do my best to replicate it for you.
I think maybe you missunderstood I wasn't looking for another interest just something that might be needed more imediatly.
Thanks, Scot
Give us your opinion Russ, what do you want to see?:D
lol...

 people doing some good and doing it open source, people getting involved and taking it on for them self's, people helping others where they can instead of starting a war, everyone coming together for the better of the planet and not the better of them self's. man jeff... that's a Brod question lol...

on the topic....

scot, lets chat it out and see where it takes us. see where you may be of the most help in your skill set, i my self am most mechanically inclined over electronics... but i get buy and most of all with the help of others!

my Skype is RWG42985. add me to your Skype and lets chat it up. see where it may take us!

the help always needed, but most of all/most important, understanding the meyer system to its fullest! and most defiantly if your going for the "water spark plug"

Thanks guys!!! blessings my friends!

~Russ
Thanks Russ, what do you think Scot?

scot

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #45, on March 24th, 2012, 05:30 PM »
Hi Russ,
My email is   in_honda@hotmail.com
My phone is 260-422-2312 or 422-9600
I talk on the phone better than I write, obviously
I think once you talk with me you'll have a better idea what to do with me.
Thanks,Scot
RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #46, on March 24th, 2012, 05:30 PM »
Hi Russ,
My email is   in_honda@hotmail.com
My phone is 260-422-2312 or 422-9600
I talk on the phone better than I write, obviously
I think once you talk with me you'll have a better idea what to do with me.
Thanks,Scot

securesupplies

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #47, on April 13th, 2012, 11:20 AM »
Quote from securesupplies on March 20th, 2012, 08:25 AM
Now that is awesome

who is  going to be first to adapt that baby
PS Part number is

Auburn I-10-25
Ignitor Flame Rod Liquid Level Electrode

ps check this last post ,

telsa ignitor
http://open-source-energy.org/?tid=188&pid=3699#pid3699


note the part number every one,


better buy and post any sources part numbers you find

and attached

Daniel
BINGO

CHECK THIS PIC OUT  DOES NOT GET MUCH CLEARER THAN THIS

FLAME IGNITOR



Jeff Nading

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #48, on April 14th, 2012, 10:09 AM »
Quote from securesupplies on April 13th, 2012, 11:20 AM
Quote from securesupplies on March 20th, 2012, 08:25 AM
Now that is awesome

who is  going to be first to adapt that baby
PS Part number is

Auburn I-10-25
Ignitor Flame Rod Liquid Level Electrode

ps check this last post ,

telsa ignitor
http://open-source-energy.org/?tid=188&pid=3699#pid3699


note the part number every one,


better buy and post any sources part numbers you find

and attached

Daniel
BINGO

CHECK THIS PIC OUT  DOES NOT GET MUCH CLEARER THAN THIS

FLAME IGNITOR
Very good photo's, Jeff.

scot

RE: Water spark plug replication.
« Reply #49, on April 15th, 2012, 08:17 AM »
   Hi all,
I'm a little confused are those modifided 1-10-25 igniters and if they are who did it, was it Stan?
Hey Russ missed your call sorry.
I see now the two types of injectors, I need input as which one is more workable for your aplication. I don't see any problem building either one.
Thanks, Scot
PS, maybe we could get Auburn or Champion to send us a few insulators, course then again maybe I could salvalge some from some old plugs, just thinking out loud.