advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit

evostars

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #150,  »
thinking how I could use a setup up (im) pulse transformer, like a ignition coil (but based on faster ferrite)

I came up with this.

instead of using a single L1 to produce impulses,
I use a tranformer.

the secondary output (giving the stepped up impulse) is connected with a slow diode.

the diode must be fast enough for the series resonant L2 to work (100kHz), but slow enough, to block the impulse of the primary(1mHz or more).

the secondary HV impulse than can find its way through the series resonant coil (to V+ that acts as ground)

This way I would get a higher voltage impulse, through the coil.

Probably wont work, but easy to build and try
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #151,  »
I have recieved nice Sic mosfets 160mOhm 1200V
2m0160120d
https://www.mouser.com/ds/2/90/2m0160120d-838563.pdf

the gate needs - 5 to 20V with 25v max

I want to use batteries to power the (isolated) gate.

with 2x 12V battery, i get 26.8V max.

I want to use a negative offset,
is there a trick for this?
I have no idea how much current the gate will need, thats why I doubt over a voltage divider resistor...

Any ideas anyone?
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #152,  »
I'm mostly thinking of 2 progressions:
bigger voltage impulse
and
the use of a ferrite or perovskite layer on one side of the coil to make the longitudinal push from the impulse, only into one direction (one side of the pancake).
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #153,  »Last edited
I've been thinking about stepping up the impulse voltage.
I'm now working with - 600V 700nS max
I could double the voltage with the SiC mosfet to -1200V
but...
What about stepping it up to -15000V?
-15kV can be done.

I mean... it could work, 1200v and it would prove it would work.

but I rather do it proper, to really push over the threshold in a single effort...
not wasting a lot if time... and energy. on something amazing that would need improvement again, to become really usefull.

let's really kick some longitudinal ass
and step it up. So we can drive a motor if it works
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #154,  »
I could use a second mosfet to trigger a stepup transformer, so its synced to the series resonant  coil.
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #156,  »
I saw SiC mosfets that can handle 6.5kV or even more.
I guess they will have high resistance
not sure. but SiC IGBT might be interesting to look at.

any body know one with low resistance(leas than 0.5 ohm, and high frequency (70kHz) capabilities?

Other thing I noticed was:
how about using the 1200V SiC mosfets,
but with a smaller coil, so the push would be relatively bigger. (to the coil surface area).

I made my coils bigger, with thicker wire. resulting in High Q (low resistance) and high capacitance.

But bigger coils need bigger impulses to push longitudinal waves.


Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #157,  »Last edited

Lynx

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #158,  »
I saw that Mouser also has LSIC1MO120E0080 to offer, SIC mosfet N-channel, 1200V, 80 mOhm, TO247, 39A with fairly decent rise/fall times 10/6 ns, at OK tinkering-with-and-frying prices.

But I agree, 85€ is really not an option unless you know it works :fear:

evostars

the art of stepup
« Reply #159,  »
made a step up transformer from a ferrite ring core I still had.
FT-240-43 u=850 AL1075
was the code for the ring

don't know if it is suited gor 70kHz.

first made 12 thick copper windings as primary, and tested. gave sub uS spikes at 70kHz.

then took 9.5meter 0.4mm wire for approx 180 windings on the secondary.

but this caused the primary to start ringing. I tried to create a spark, and it worked only around 20kHz. with 16V dc input.

need to hook it up so it can work into a coil.

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Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #160,  »
Quote from Lynx on July 3rd, 06:28 AM
I saw that Mouser also has LSIC1MO120E0080 to offer, SIC mosfet N-channel, 1200V, 80 mOhm, TO247, 39A with fairly decent rise/fall times 10/6 ns, at OK tinkering-with-and-frying prices.

But I agree, 85€ is really not an option unless you know it works :fear:
Thanks.
yes... crazy prices..
cool caps. 2000V while rated 400v
« Reply #161,  »
also set up the health configuration. with the bigger secondary.
113nF series resonant cap
20nF parallel output cap
43.76 kHz
900nS - 660V impulse.
series resonant is 376V peak to peak.
parallel resonant is off scale I guess 2000V peak to peak.

parallel tunes with 2x 10nF wima FKP1 rated at 630V dc and 400V ac.
they stay cold, in tune and make no sound.
rather cool. since they are handling 2kV at 43.76kHz

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one side hot
« Reply #162,  »Last edited
When testing the step up transformer,
I switched the primary on the high side, producing a negative spike.

The secondary was not grounded, I let both ends short out via the sparkgap.
I noticed one end becoming redhot, and the other end not.

I assumed the redhot side, was the positive, so I grounded it, and did a few more tests. this time, nothing got red hot.

the ringing on the primary, only occured when ther was no spark. once a spark was visible, the primary showed a single spike.
So, It still might work on higher frequencies, as long as the secondary is grounded on one side, and the other end of the secondary, will pass through the series resonant coil to ground. (ground will be V+).

The question is, how to connect the secondary, without shorting things out. I might need a cap
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #163,  »Last edited
secondary of left step up transformer, is relative higher impedance then the L1 coil on the right.
Both produce back emf, they mix.

I need to remove the dc offset parts, or else they will charge up to several KV which the caps cant handle.

A fast diode could fix that also.
make a barier between the kV impulse entry point, and the dc offset cap.
probably will need more than one diode in series, to handle the kV impulse

removing the dc offset also would not protect the mosfet from the kV impulse. the body diode avalanche mode would pass the impulse straight to V+

several ultra fast diodes in series should  work, to prevent the stepped up impulse from reaching the mosfets body diode

 stepup2.jpg - 61.93 kB, 954x466, viewed 3 times.

insight: impulse amplifies current
« Reply #164,  »Last edited
A impulse is a high change in voltage, in a very small amount of time.
1000V in 1uS or less.

The time the impulse is injected in the series resonant bifilar pancake coil,
Is at the maximum voltage. which is when the magnetic field strength is zero.

But the change in magnetic field strength is maximum.
It is as if the Aether that forms the magnetic field, is a vortex (on both sides of the coil) that collapses, and then re appears but now its counter rotating.
The impulse happens at the peak of the collapse, when the current is zero but the aether field is moving very hard,

So there is no magnetic field at the time of the impulse.

The voltage is at its maximum. the change in voltage is zero, the dielectric field is at its strongest.

That's when we introduce a rapid change in voltage. this translates, to a very high current.

This results in a extra strong swing of the magnetic field, and it is amplified by this action. It is getting a Kick right at the best moment.

Or... just after the peak, just like with a swing. We dont push at the highest dead point. we push just after it, when the movement downwards is starting again.

So the impulse amplifies the current.

But... If the impulse is powerfull enough, meaning, high enough voltage, and short enough duration, the magnetic field is simply to slow in its build up. And the dielectric field that represents this change in voltage, will create a longitudinal Aether movement, that is related to the ring vortex.

This ring vortex, is captured by a second coil (L3 output), that has a large load, where this immense energy can work into.
the load transmuted the energy into heat and light or whatever (water into H2 and O2, after being rectified).

So the impulse will need to work into  someting, else it simply wont work. the impulse will not come through. it will ripple.

Another thing, is the DC ofset of the series resonant coil, in relation to the L3 coil, it will create a path for the longitudinal energy to follow.

in conclusion, if I slow down the impulse, I can amplify the magnetic field of the series resonant coil, this makes it possible to float a aluminium foil around 42kHz

If I make the impulse fast enough, the magnetic field is to slow to catch the large amount of energy, and  it will create a longitudinal aether pressure field (ring vortex). But only is it can work into a load.

This also indicates, a lower frequency works best for longitudinal pressure. As the relative speed between the impulse and the magnetic field is bigger. The magnetic field is slower changing at lower frequencies, so the fast impulse, is much to fast to interact with the slow magnetic field vortex.

I will record this into VR to make it more clear in pictures.
punch through
« Reply #165,  »
I am playing with the health setup again, small L2 4 cm distanced to big L3.
Tuning L3 to L2.
I now have tuned it to 36kHz with L2 93nF
L3 is only 7.1 nF (tuned with my tuning board, steps of 100pF possible)

L3 is a octave higher then L2, and when I impulse L2, L3 will grow into a huge sine wave, one octave higher.
Very impressive to see. But, I will tune it again, to one octave lower, so it will match L2.
smokey
« Reply #166,  »
gate driver boost converter started smoking...
I inserted the diodes, 5x600V so it woupd hopefully block 3000V

I tested and it looked promising, good impulse.  went down in frequency, impulse became pretty big, but than amps went up, and the smoke come from the stepup circuit....

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 stepup2 (1).jpg - 61.93 kB, 954x466, viewed once.

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #167,  »
Diplomacy
the vortex is the magnetic aether  field.
have you concidered the ring vortex?
it represents the radiant aether field (induced by impulses)

the impuls is like the tail on this picture. pushing inwards into the ring vortex, giving a result of resonance where current and votage are inphase. (i have experimentaly proven this in my radiant power video)

the ring vortex rotation direction is its polarity.

it grows and shrinks, then reverses and grows again, this time with its tail on the other side of the ring vortex. This time it sucks in from the ambient Aether.

The impulse needs to be powerfull enough. high enough voltage within less than 1 uS

 maxresdefault.jpg - 41.1 kB, 1280x720, viewed 3 times.


Diplomacy

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #168,  »
Quote from evostars on July 7th, 02:38 AM
the vortex is the magnetic aether  field.
have you concidered the ring vortex?
it represents the radiant aether field (induced by impulses)
Mapping a coil on the surface of exactly that shape with a phi ratio center hole was my next planned build, similar to the rodin coil.
Essentially the goal is to map the surface area of the torroid with minimum sharp turns, we are trying to make a waveguide for the aether to travel through creating as long as of a path as possible.

I disagree on the length of the pulse, I think it depends on how much the aether sticks to the load, the more the load has an affinity for holding the aether the slower pulse times that will exhibit odd effects, the really fast pulse times you are seeing required are because of making your coils with small diameter wire.

The problem is there are breakpoints for max voltage ratings, forward voltage drops and response times in all these electronics and then matching all of those to a coil set.


evostars

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #169,  »
Ok let's agree to disagree on the impulse. I have seen its effects And know they are vital (also backed up with Tesla's lectures).

my wire diameter is 1.5mm2 and 2.5mm2
So you call that thin?

As this is my workbench, please put your own thoughts and experiments on another page/section of the forum, as I want to keep this workbench clear of it.

you are welcome to respond here but only if it is related to the contence of this workbench, which is based on impulse technology.

thank you

Diplomacy

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #170,  »
Quote from evostars on July 7th, 03:03 AM
Ok let's agree to disagree on the impulse. I have seen its effects And know they are vital (also backed up with Tesla's lectures).

my wire diameter is 1.5mm2 and 2.5mm2
So you call that thin?

As this is my workbench, please put your own thoughts and experiments on another page/section of the forum, as I want to keep this workbench clear of it.

you are welcome to respond here but only if it is related to the contence of this workbench, which is based on impulse technology.

thank you
I apologize, I meant no disrespect.
I did not realize you were using such thick wires, the last video I watched fully you were using speaker wire (I am on a limited data connection and do not stream often).

By impulses are you referring to the turbine effect where sufficient speed (in this case sufficiently short pulse duration) causes that ring vortex pulse?
Kind looks like a jellyfish swimming, but it is the coils energizing that builds the potential.

I was not aware that Tesla reported a hard cap on the speed of the impulses required to obtain these effects, my understanding of the matter was that it was the combination of sufficiently fast impulse and sufficiently high voltage that allowed these flows to occur and that there is a range of times that can work if other conditions in the circuit are correct.

Is the 1 microsecond limit peak to peak or maximum rise time that allows such an effect?



evostars

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #171,  »
Quote from Diplomacy on July 7th, 03:27 AM
I apologize, I meant no disrespect.
I did not realize you were using such thick wires, the last video I watched fully you were using speaker wire (I am on a limited data connection and do not stream often).

By impulses are you referring to the turbine effect where sufficient speed (in this case sufficiently short pulse duration) causes that ring vortex pulse?
Kind looks like a jellyfish swimming, but it is the coils energizing that builds the potential.

I was not aware that Tesla reported a hard cap on the speed of the impulses required to obtain these effects, my understanding of the matter was that it was the combination of sufficiently fast impulse and sufficiently high voltage that allowed these flows to occur and that there is a range of times that can work if other conditions in the circuit are correct.

Is the 1 microsecond limit peak to peak or maximum rise time that allows such an effect?
I'm sensitive about it, because many people have many opinions, and I don't want to get distracted (I am contacted by many) So I stick to experimental results.

I do use speaker wire. pure copper for low resistance, and there are many thicknesses. I used 0.75mm2 before (and it works). but now use 1,5mm2 12,5 meter, total 25 meter. for increased capcitance and inductance, with decreased resistance.

I'm not familiar with turbine effect.
the impulse gives a longitudinal push (like a tsunami)

I'm still looking into the impulse speed, I read abou the 1uS in " cold war technology", made a video series about that book.

peak to peak? there is only one peak, as it is unipolar.
I measure (in my setup I just tuned with 330pF) a 750nS period, where the impulse goes from 0volts to -650V to 0 volts
repair the smoke
« Reply #172,  »
Since I smoked one gate driver I will repair it and convert it to make a SiC mosfet work.
The smoke came from the boostconverter, and thats the part I needed to replace anyway.
So maybe its another "sign" a good luck accident?

The SiC gate needs 20V to source, and I will provide it with battery power.
insight, impulse stutter
« Reply #173,  »
I have noticed the impulse can be delayed, but also it can stutter, devide itself into multiplie smaller impulses that quickly repeat themselfs.

The impulse is the magnetic field energy of the coil that is switched off.

this energy is directed into the series resonant coil.

the series resonance provides a low impedance path to ground (v+)

It the series resonance isn't properly tuned in, the impulse energy has no where to flow into, it is stuck inside the coil, it starts oscillating and when positive it will pass through the body diode into v+ losing its power.

If the coil is properly tuned into series resonance, and injected at its maximum voltage peak, the impulse can flow through it.  creating a longitudinal pressure wave.
as explained before.

but if not properly tuned, the impulse will ripple

gate driver fail
« Reply #174,  »Last edited
I isolated the problem to the boost converter as I suspected. the primary is shorting out.
Will remove it, and replace it with batteries. 20V is needed to drive the 1200V SiC mosfets

I will use a 12V 7ah battery in series with 4 parallel 9V's making 21 V