advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit

evostars

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #125,  »Last edited
Made a new L3 coil
2.5mm2  equal weight (to l2) , 7.19 meters

its smaller in diameter. I also made the center hole smaller.

the dielectric lines of force will now converge from the bigger L2 (1.5mm2) to the smaller L3.
then from L3 diverge to L1

L3 in the middle.

this converging and diverging is what also happens in the center of a ring vortex

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Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #126,  »
L3 in the middle, not tuned, already makes the 28W bulb glow from 13.3W

if that was a 5w 12V bulb it would be bright

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Inverse logic of the dielectric field
« Reply #127,  »
I remembered Steinmetz lessons on the inverse relation between the magnetic field and the dielectric field.
most of the knowledge is based on the magnetic field.

so our logic follows the magnetic field logic.
Like a transformer steps up voltage if it has more windings,
and it steps up current if it has less windings.

But a dielectric transformer,
a resonant transformer,
Works different. It follows the inverse logic of the dielectric field.

I really like the concept of the a-symetric capacitor. where the dielectric lines of force are more concentrated on the smaller plate.
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #128,  »
And I made another L2 (or L1) coil.
now I have 4 equal coils amd one "smaller"

this is for the dual setup.
2 drive circuits, 2x L1 2x L2 and 1 L3 im the middle, that will recieve impulses from both sides (from both L2's).

The impulses will alternate, one on each maximum.

but I explained this before. no need to repeat myself
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #129,  »
My SiC mosfet has fused together with the heatsink/fan...

I used thermal paste, and there was a biy left over from the other mosfet when I aplied it

I guess, they mixed and under the heat, formed a kind of ceramic glue...

I wanted to replace it with a irfp460A

But Since I am now stuck with it, I will remove the irfp460 from the other heat sink and put another SiC in there.

that would leave me with 2 SiC c2m0160120 mosfets, instead of 2 irfp460..

I does require 20V at the gate instead of 14, so I first need to adjust both gate drivers...
This would result in 1200V impulse capabilities.

Or... I just order another heatsink for the irfp460

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Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #130,  »
Had an irfp460 on an old heat sink...
will need to do for now, could even put a fan on it with some creativity (plenty of that)

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Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #131,  »
I ripped the broken fan oit of the heatsink frame and hotglued a new fan in.
 :D

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dual setup
« Reply #132,  »Last edited
dual setup first test, and it works.
not properly tuned, but lamp already burns

I labeled the coils in the photo (click it)

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achievement
« Reply #133,  »
It is sooooo cool to see this dual setup working!!!
 :cool:
This has always been in the back of my mind for years now.
 :clap2:

I remember thinking:
" if a tesla coil has a strong dielectric (resonant) field, then 2 tesla coils, out of phase, should have a dielectric field between them that alternates strongly. What If you put a coil between those to dynamic dielectric fields?" .

But at the time, I didn't know how to make it work, how to get them tuned, and out of phase.
And ... I didn't know about the impulses.

I have learned SO MUCH :yoda:

I even got the coils right, one system is out of phase, so I reversed one set of L1 L2 (close coupled, L1 outside, L2 facing the single L3) coils.

Now its first time, to tune both the L2 coils, to the same resonant frequency, by tuning one of the series resonant capacitors. They are slighly out of tune now. not much...
Frequency is also to high 108kHz. Dont want to get sick again. the series resonant cap is now 33nF, probably will make it 60nF, and tune from there on.

2 kinds of electricity
« Reply #134,  »
What has become clear, by analysing sparks, is there are 2 kinds of electricity.
One looks like the erratic blue violet spark, destructive/hot in nature and deflected by magnetic fields
one looks like a gaseous white flame, non destructive aka Radiant electricity, not deflected by magnetic fields.

The negative back emf looks to be the pure white flame energy, without the purple blue energy.
I showed this in the discharge video, posted in the comments here.

I have ordered a step up transformer, to make it discharge more visible, but I have strong doubts the white flame radiant electricity will be stepped up, as it is not deflected by the magnetic field, and a step up transformer, is based on the magnetic field induction.

What I have been doing, is powering the series resonant coil, from the regular (mixed) electricity,
And feeding it with negative back emf impulses, aka radiant electricity. 

I have been wondering about how these 2 mix the best.
I have seen the benefits, of increased voltage and increased current in the series resonant coil, when the impulse is fed into it.

I wonder, If the mix balance is best, wouldn't that change the impulse? make it faster? (seen that) make it more or less negative?
But most of all, would it increase the series resonant current to its maximum?

Also, if the mix is Ideal, the longitudinal pressure from the coil would be maximum.

I have been looking at voltage differences over the series resonant coil, but,
 we are dealing with 2 different KINDS of voltages
one "regular" one "radiant"
one white gaseous,
one purple blue erratic.

I keep thinking there should be an ideal mix of these 2, resulting in maximum longitudinal pressure.
Simple voltage differnce isn't enough.

The resonant voltage on one side of the coil, (can be positive or negative, depending on tuning)
The negative impulse voltage on the other side of the coil.

hmmm....
maximum current... is measurable.


Lynx

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #135,  »
Awesome, that's some impressive benching you got going there :thumbsup2:

haxar

Re: achievement
« Reply #136,  »
Quote from evostars on June 25th, 12:46 PM
I remember thinking:
" if a tesla coil has a strong dielectric (resonant) field, then 2 tesla coils, out of phase, should have a dielectric field between them that alternates strongly. What If you put a coil between those to dynamic dielectric fields?" .

But at the time, I didn't know how to make it work, how to get them tuned, and out of phase.
And ... I didn't know about the impulses.
Phases only relate to an alternating or direct current TEM wave, while electrostatic impulse LMD waves do not have a phase relationship.

My hypothesis: This circuit utilizes a resonant alternating current TEM wave (preferably from a "resonant chamber" in the form of a long inductive wire that holds a lossless resonant magnetic field) to trigger LMD impulses off that resonant TEM wave.
Quote from evostars on June 26th, 09:32 AM
I have been looking at voltage differences over the series resonant coil, but,
 we are dealing with 2 different KINDS of voltages
one "regular" one "radiant"
one white gaseous,
one purple blue erratic.

The only 2 different kinds of waves, known to exist in this universe.

evostars

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #137,  »
Quote from haxar on June 26th, 01:56 PM
Phases only relate to an alternating or direct current TEM wave, while electrostatic impulse LMD waves do not have a phase relationship.

My hypothesis: This circuit utilizes a resonant alternating current TEM wave (preferably from a "resonant chamber" in the form of a long inductive wire that holds a lossless resonant magnetic field) to trigger LMD impulses off that resonant TEM wave.
The only 2 different kinds of waves, known to exist in this universe.
So I am combining the 2 waves,
combining TEM with longitudinal...
hmm I have to think about that, what is the result from that?
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #138,  »
Quote from Lynx on June 26th, 12:08 PM
Awesome, that's some impressive benching you got going there :thumbsup2:
Thanks!
 ^-^

Diplomacy

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #139,  »Last edited
Quote from evostars on June 26th, 02:30 PM
So I am combining the 2 waves,
combining TEM with longitudinal...
hmm I have to think about that, what is the result from that?
A vortex in the aether.
The two types of sparks you talk about are not two different kinds of electricity, but two methods by which it moves.
The aether behaves as an ideal gas, you can move it by force (blue sparks) and this method inherently uses a high heat and is entropic in nature no matter how this push is made, this mode is limited by thermodynamic laws as taught in schools.

The other type of spark is not created forcibly, it is an overflow, a local condition of abundance that is so strong it spills into the surrounding matter. To my knowledge the only way to do this is to create a vortex in the aether, I have learned several methods since we last spoke. Nested cylinders of 316l stainless, filled with water, with a positive voltage applied to the outer casing and negative to the centerpost as a drain creates a very strong vortex if properly constructed, putting two vortexes adjacent to each other mutually strengthens both vortexes according to the poster in the Tesla Turbine thread over on the other forum, next time I put my things together I will report results of coupling two of them.
A single cylinder constructed this way splits water efficiently and gets colder than ambient while doing so, but it requires the build up of a highly resistive coating on the stainless steel before it happens.

What all of these come down to is being able to make that overflow of energy and then having a machine that can draw on that flow.
Part of a machine for instance that was full of the compressed form of the aether that makes the cold sparks could use the area where the energy was being converted from cold to hot as a heat sink and get more amps on the hot side.

edit: I have seen several researchers claim that ambient energy likes load, which is yet again a higher concentration and/or hotter aether region flowing into an area with a lower aether concentration, anywhere it can dissipate its pressure. Creating pressure (voltage) for (nearly) free to sustain a vortex to draw flow (amperage) off of is the basic summary of this big discovery of the use of the fluid medium that Tesla reported.

Are you still using a power MOSFET as the substitute for the spark gap in your circuits? Is there a particular type or parameter I should be sorting by? I have been using old automotive ignition control modules in the analogous portion on the circuit I have been using to drive all my devices, but a good MOSFET will likely be able to handle higher frequencies?

evostars

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #140,  »
Quote from Diplomacy on June 27th, 03:34 AM
A vortex in the aether.
The two types of sparks you talk about are not two different kinds of electricity, but two methods by which it moves.
The aether behaves as an ideal gas, you can move it by force (blue sparks) and this method inherently uses a high heat and is entropic in nature no matter how this push is made, this mode is limited by thermodynamic laws as taught in schools.

The other type of spark is not created forcibly, it is an overflow, a local condition of abundance that is so strong it spills into the surrounding matter. To my knowledge the only way to do this is to create a vortex in the aether, I have learned several methods since we last spoke. Nested cylinders of 316l stainless, filled with water, with a positive voltage applied to the outer casing and negative to the centerpost as a drain creates a very strong vortex if properly constructed, putting two vortexes adjacent to each other mutually strengthens both vortexes according to the poster in the Tesla Turbine thread over on the other forum, next time I put my things together I will report results of coupling two of them.
A single cylinder constructed this way splits water efficiently and gets colder than ambient while doing so, but it requires the build up of a highly resistive coating on the stainless steel before it happens.

What all of these come down to is being able to make that overflow of energy and then having a machine that can draw on that flow.
Part of a machine for instance that was full of the compressed form of the aether that makes the cold sparks could use the area where the energy was being converted from cold to hot as a heat sink and get more amps on the hot side.

edit: I have seen several researchers claim that ambient energy likes load, which is yet again a higher concentration and/or hotter aether region flowing into an area with a lower aether concentration, anywhere it can dissipate its pressure. Creating pressure (voltage) for (nearly) free to sustain a vortex to draw flow (amperage) off of is the basic summary of this big discovery of the use of the fluid medium that Tesla reported.

Are you still using a power MOSFET as the substitute for the spark gap in your circuits? Is there a particular type or parameter I should be sorting by? I have been using old automotive ignition control modules in the analogous portion on the circuit I have been using to drive all my devices, but a good MOSFET will likely be able to handle higher frequencies?
when did we last speak? Can't remember?
Yes, a Mosfet is a more fast acting switch. look for SiC mosfets, with high drain source voltage, and low drain source resistance.  A proper mosfet driver is needed (to switch high side).
I use the mosfet, to switch a coil on the high side (V+ is switched, not ground) to produce negative back EMF, this is the other electricity kind, that is white gaseous.
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #141,  »
" it likes a load"
Yes, i heard E Dollard say the same.
"something to work into"

So testing a unloaded L2 makes no sense,
It needs something to work into.
aka the untuned L3 with a parallel resistive load.

Then measure the current in L3 (or brightness of a lamp)

But... as I am changing frequency (by changing series cap with my new board).

The power consumption changes, as the back emf becomes bigger with lower frequencies, and thus needs to be retuned.
there are so many variables and question marks.
...

but its clear I need a load. ok.
but power out vs in is hard to determine.
both change. simple brightness doesnt cut it. L3 current also is hard, as the current clamp isnt precise, it changes when I move its position.

One thing I have done is keep the impulse at the same voltage...
lower frequency, takes less power for equal pulse voltage.

F@ck
Sometimes I feel as if people are watching over my shoulder, and I feel As if I'm being stupid. because I dont get it.
but its my own judgemental mind judging me....

How can it be, that L3 produces power? in phase voltage and current,  by being coupled with a series resonant (out of phase current and voltage) L2.

L2 should NOT have ANY power.
what does this impulse do? to provide power to L2/L3?

Is it a longitudinal pressure wave?
Or is it something else?

is the negative back emf radiant voltage providing power/force to the resonant voltage?

Is impulse duration really important? should it be less then 1uS? (pretty sure it should be short)

questions....

One thing is sure...

I really need a 4 channel scope.
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #142,  »
if TEM is mixed with longitudinal waves...

TEM are slower (lightspeed)
longitudinal is faster (than lightspeed)

how can they mix when the speeds don't match?

haxar

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #143,  »
Quote from evostars on June 27th, 11:21 AM
if TEM is mixed with longitudinal waves...

TEM are slower (lightspeed)
longitudinal is faster (than lightspeed)

how can they mix when the speeds don't match?
Example:
Quote from Newfile8.jpeg
The blip on the blue trace, which is the LMD impulse, is faster than the yellow trace of an alternating current TEM wave.

The circuit triggers an LMD impulse right after the positive peak of the slower TEM wave. (Nelson "crypticly" said this before, but is better understood this way with the differing wave types.)

evostars

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #144,  »
Quote from haxar on June 27th, 12:54 PM
The circuit triggers an LMD impulse right after the positive peak of the slower TEM wave.
No the circuit doesn't trigger it

the impulse IS the back emf of L1, being fed into L2

the question is how/when do the positive resonant voltage and the negative impulse mix best?

When does it give max power?

when does it produce the maximum longitudinal wave from Bifilar L2?

It apears this needs to be balanced (the 2 different quality voltages on both ends of L2) , for max result.

But how can we measure/see the max result?
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #145,  »Last edited
Thinking of the fused SiC mosfet (to the heasink) I tend to see it as a sign.

the mosfet is capable of (at least) handling a -1200V back emf.

Until now I used a max of - 600V impulses.

These SiC mosfets would double the negative voltage impulses.

my caps can handle it (dc offset).

Maybe, I'm just below the voltage threshold...
inverse relationship, impulse and series resonance frequency
« Reply #146,  »
If I add capacitance to the series resonant L2 tuning cap,
I lower the frequency.
The resonant voltage/current becomes smaller
And the impulse voltage becomes greater.
Less voltage and more current is needed from the DC input to generate the maximum impulse

If I make the series resonant capacitance smaller,
the frequency rises,
The resonant voltage/current becomes bigger (hmm is that right?)
And the impulse voltage becomes smaller.
More voltage and less current of the DC input is needed, to get the maximum impulse

Somewhere, there is an Ideal, impulse voltage and series resonant voltage current.
Giving both maximum impulse voltage, and resonant voltage/current.

Minimum impulse duration should be tuned by the parallel capacitor over L1. fast, without hickups. now using 660pF
SiC gate drivers
« Reply #147,  »Last edited
I have decided to make 2 new gate drivers for the wolfspeed/cree SiC mosfets. they need 20V gate to source voltage

I hope to make it with the 12 to 15 volt 2A isolated boost converters I already have.
I noticed I can vary the output by the input voltage. Not sure If it can handle 20V output. Would be nice if it worked.
We'll see.

I could place 2 of the boosters in parallel, if the power isn't enough

15.5V input gives 20V output, with a 1K load. 20mA  it already gets warm... better look for other solution.

Solution: use battery on gate side
Sic data sheet 2m0160120d
https://www.mouser.com/ds/2/90/2m0160120d-838563.pdf
doesnt give a lot of gate voltage info...

gate source voltage max= 25V recommend =20V
2x 12V should work. put a 25V zener over it for protection.
or 12V+ 9v (several 9v parallel, with 12V series)

Lynx

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #148,  »
Is there any such readily available high & low side gate driving IC circuit which has it all, including say 20V fully isolated power output for gate control purposes?
It is 2019 after all, so combining the two (DC/DC converter and high/low side gate driver) shouldn't be all that hard to put together.
Or so one might think anyway.

evostars

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #149,  »
Quote from Lynx on June 29th, 08:53 AM
Is there any such readily available high & low side gate driving IC circuit which has it all, including say 20V fully isolated power output for gate control purposes?
It is 2019 after all, so combining the two (DC/DC converter and high/low side gate driver) shouldn't be all that hard to put together.
Or so one might think anyway.
maybe google knows :D
matt has a great driver, and there are developers boards that might do the trick.