Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC

HMS-776

Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
«  »Last edited
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=W-9PdVLU6zw

Just explaining my research on one aspect of the VIC.

One problem we've all had is getting voltage to our cells. If you build a VIC to match Stan's you have to gap the core, just like Stan did.

The problem is once you gap the core you introduce a high leakage inductance to the VIC which causes it to have very poor voltage regulation.

So, when you connect the VIC to your cells and pulse the primary coil with 7.8V like I did your voltage across the cell should be 52V (because of the step up transformer) but instead you get 2V across it. This is because of the poor voltage regulation of the VIC.

So what does it mean?
As my measurements show it takes a load impedance greater than 1M ohm to get the full 52V across it when pulsed at 10kHz.

The chokes are not large enough to produce even 100k Ohms impedance at 10kHz.

The high impedance is required to begin to see any appreciable voltage across the cell so where does that impedance come from?

Ronnie stated several years ago you have to get current flowing through the cells first. Once you do you'll begin to produce basic electrolysis.

The gas bubbles produced by electrolysis, many of which stick to the electrodes from tension and electric field forces actually reduce the surface area of the electrodes.

In a previous video I showed that if you reduce electrode surface area by 1/2 while maintaining the same gap the resistance between the electrodes will double.

So, as the gas bubbles form on the electrodes the surface area is reduced which increases the resistance between the electrodes.

As this begins to occur the voltage of the cells starts to increase. Then and only then can you tune into resonance and get the voltages in the kV range.

More to come...

securesupplies


HMS-776

Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #2,  »
Thanks for embedding the video file. Not sure if its the browser I'm using or what but I couldn't get it to work.

Lynx

Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #3,  »
Impressive tutorial HMS, many thanks :thumbsup:
Kinda makes you think about what if you were to apply a constant current circuit on your cell, would the voltage increase as more and more bubbles form?
Most interesting, keep up the good work :-)

warj1990

Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #4,  »
I know this is trivial to the topic...but I have seen 150 volts across my water cell.  It was 1 inch by 3 inch (2.5 inch in water), with around 1/8 inch spacing.

The water was "tap" with either 4 or 6 ppm.

The issue I had was above conductive voltage it just appeared normal electrolysis and based on current flow. (150 volts @ 200 ma)

W.


securesupplies

Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #5,  »
did you have a choke and blocking diode? did you use a gate
look at this thread use the circuits

I am sure you will have a different view if you study them
https://open-source-energy.org/?topic=3460.msg53361#msg53361
Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #6,  »Last edited
Quote from HMS-776 on July 13th, 08:10 PM
Thanks for embedding the video file. Not sure if its the browser I'm using or what but I couldn't get it to work.
Your Welcome

Dear Brad ,   Great Videos, I think it is very important  to go the next step on your electrode gap distilled water resistance measurements, PLease show the same tests and data but  1 add laquar to positive, and or quartz layer.  the reason is it is a dbd barrier and smooths electrostatic the voltage held , and prevent the cell dropping to zero. Petkov showed some , I think it would be greatly beneficial to researcher to see both laquer and quartz  reaction in your test plate.  this may well stabilize resistance , Respect your opinion on this as you have the test  bed on desk to show it more precisely in line with you other videos and it makes sense to do so.  Dan  As you know well Andrija Puharich  had Glass in his patent  and Petkov tried to show it best he could first with laquar than glass I would like to see you flat mini resistance test with those also  to show precisely the comparison .

HMS-776

Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #7,  »
Quote from Lynx on July 13th, 11:32 PM
Impressive tutorial HMS, many thanks :thumbsup:
Kinda makes you think about what if you were to apply a constant current circuit on your cell, would the voltage increase as more and more bubbles form?
Most interesting, keep up the good work :-)
Thanks Lynx,

I have done tests applying 30-60Vdc across the electrodes and I was able to measure the resistance after power was disconnected. It was well over 1 Meg ohm... my meter then showed a slow decay in resistance until it dropped to around 20k ohms then it dropped faster and faster till it bottomed out.

I can't remember exactly how I did those tests or which electrodes I used...I will try and do them again and if they work I'll make a video on it.

Thanks again for the compliments.
Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #8,  »Last edited
Quote from warj1990 on July 15th, 09:29 AM
I know this is trivial to the topic...but I have seen 150 volts across my water cell.  It was 1 inch by 3 inch (2.5 inch in water), with around 1/8 inch spacing.

The water was "tap" with either 4 or 6 ppm.

The issue I had was above conductive voltage it just appeared normal electrolysis and based on current flow. (150 volts @ 200 ma)

W.
Warj1990,

How were you measuring the voltage?

I have a 4kV power supply I used to do some hv testing. With tap water the voltage was I think 80V or so if I remember correctly because the leakage current through the water was pulling the voltage down.

I can get HV pulses across the cells but they decay to 0V pretty quick.
Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #9,  »
Dan,

In the test all I had was the primary- secondary. Secondary coil had a diode and 220 ohm resistor in series.

I replied to your question on the video comments. I have never believed that Stan used any kind of coating on his cells... and IMO there are a few good reasons why.

But, patents exist that show coatings might be successful and more efficient that Stan's cell. I will make a video on this when I get the time as it's something I have had planned for a while.

The biggest problem I see is the exotic materials as well as the production difficulty. Stan even stated his goal was to use readily available off the shelf materials and to avoid complex materials or manufacturing processes to protect the tech from being controlled by the materials manufacturers.

The biggest problem is you need a material with a high dielectric constant that can pass the electric field through without breaking down.

Most coatings people have tried have low dielectric values and so the majority of the electric field is lost through the material.

warj1990

Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #10,  »
Quote from HMS-776 on July 15th, 11:04 PM
Dan,

In the test all I had was the primary- secondary. Secondary coil had a diode and 220 ohm resistor in series.

I replied to your question on the video comments. I have never believed that Stan used any kind of coating on his cells... and IMO there are a few good reasons why.

But, patents exist that show coatings might be successful and more efficient that Stan's cell. I will make a video on this when I get the time as it's something I have had planned for a while.

The biggest problem I see is the exotic materials as well as the production difficulty. Stan even stated his goal was to use readily available off the shelf materials and to avoid complex materials or manufacturing processes to protect the tech from being controlled by the materials manufacturers.

The biggest problem is you need a material with a high dielectric constant that can pass the electric field through without breaking down.

Most coatings people have tried have low dielectric values and so the majority of the electric field is lost through the material.
Positive electrode as titanium.   The Titanium converts to TiO2 from Oxygen and has a very high dielectric value.

Ebay Ti flat plate around $8. 1 inch by 3-4 inch.
( https://www.ebay.com/itm/Titanium-plate-Ti-Titan-Gr-2-ASTM-B265-Plate-Sheet-0-040-x-1-0-x-3-2-4-pcs/322765718459?hash=item4b265603bb:g:Vh4AAOxy0NtTFJ0W )
It still leaks current and the "coating" seems to fall off when you turn off the voltage pulse train.

I have played with this a little, but a second set of eyes may speed this research up.

I'm finding the statement of "manufacturing and exotic materials" a little B.S. 
Mainly over the SS304R wire and quenching tube technology.  Both seen a little exotic and expensive.

(My other comment was 150 volt pulses to the cell - I will add it to my bench section when I organize it)

W.

securesupplies

Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #11,  »Last edited
brad I put this picture here is is from stan patent it is the only one showing dbd barrier  but it does show it
Dan

warj1990

Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #12,  »
I only have these photos saved from the experiment.

The probe was an isolated and directly connected across the cell.

I have these three photos.  They are all the same, just different scan times.

Shows channel 2 in the lower left ( 0 reference).
Cell maintained around 55 volts.
Step charge to around 80 volts.


When I turn off the system it drops to 0 volts.

Ok, I'm done hijacking your project. ( just wanted to answer you ).

* Gas produced still seemed directly related to current.

W.

securesupplies

Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #13,  »
invert the signal
Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #14,  »
please end on that

as this thread d for Brads work on Resistance  on cell  can discus you circuit on other thread
Re: Video discussion/explanation of Stan's VIC
« Reply #15,  »
Quote from HMS-776 on July 15th, 11:04 PM
Dan,

In the test all I had was the primary- secondary. Secondary coil had a diode and 220 ohm resistor in series.

I replied to your question on the video comments. I have never believed that Stan used any kind of coating on his cells... and IMO there are a few good reasons why.

But, patents exist that show coatings might be successful and more efficient that Stan's cell. I will make a video on this when I get the time as it's something I have had planned for a while.

The biggest problem I see is the exotic materials as well as the production difficulty. Stan even stated his goal was to use readily available off the shelf materials and to avoid complex materials or manufacturing processes to protect the tech from being controlled by the materials manufacturers.

The biggest problem is you need a material with a high dielectric constant that can pass the electric field through without breaking down.

Most coatings people have tried have low dielectric values and so the majority of the electric field is lost through the material.
GREAT