Meyer cell, stopping current flowing in both directions.

nav

Meyer cell, stopping current flowing in both directions.
« on March 22nd, 2013, 02:03 PM »
Hi all,
It would make the job much easier in the Meyer fuel cell if we could simply allow the water capacitor to charge to its full voltage potential and create the required voltage field without any current leakage in either direction. The diode in Stan's schematics in between the VIC and the inductor clearly stops the current flowing in one direction but electrically it allows the half rectified current from the VIC to flow in the other direction. Now if we placed another diode in the circuit between the other inductor and the VIC, the cap would not charge at all so we cannot do that. So I began to think of a way to do it which allowed a diode in both directions but still allowed a potential to build up on the water capacitor and I came up with this:-
[attachment=3552]
My thinking is, if we can create a slightly lower potential on the lower cap plate with the use of a variable resister capacitively coupled to L1 variable inductor then we can jump the diode via a spark gap. That way we can create a potential on both plates while stopping current flow in either direction and maintaining a constant electrical voltage field in the cap even though the water was conductive.

RE: Meyer cell, stopping current flowing in both directions.
« Reply #1, on March 24th, 2013, 10:09 AM »
Quote from nav on March 22nd, 2013, 02:03 PM
Hi all,
It would make the job much easier in the Meyer fuel cell if we could simply allow the water capacitor to charge to its full voltage potential and create the required voltage field without any current leakage in either direction. The diode in Stan's schematics in between the VIC and the inductor clearly stops the current flowing in one direction but electrically it allows the half rectified current from the VIC to flow in the other direction. Now if we placed another diode in the circuit between the other inductor and the VIC, the cap would not charge at all so we cannot do that. So I began to think of a way to do it which allowed a diode in both directions but still allowed a potential to build up on the water capacitor and I came up with this:-

My thinking is, if we can create a slightly lower potential on the lower cap plate with the use of a variable resister capacitively coupled to L1 variable inductor then we can jump the diode via a spark gap. That way we can create a potential on both plates while stopping current flow in either direction and maintaining a constant electrical voltage field in the cap even though the water was conductive.
Its a dead short, it won't work BTW.

Ravenous Emu

RE: Meyer cell, stopping current flowing in both directions.
« Reply #2, on March 24th, 2013, 12:43 PM »
Nav,

Take a look into flyback converters.  It may give you some ideas. :D :cool: :P
This is a website I found helpful in describing the overall process.  Step by Step.
http://www.dos4ever.com/flyback/flyback.html#flyback2

nav

RE: Meyer cell, stopping current flowing in both directions.
« Reply #3, on March 24th, 2013, 01:01 PM »
Quote from Ravenous Emu on March 24th, 2013, 12:43 PM
Nav,

Take a look into flyback converters.  It may give you some ideas. :D :cool: :P
This is a website I found helpful in describing the overall process.  Step by Step.
http://www.dos4ever.com/flyback/flyback.html#flyback2
Hi Rav,
TY for the link. Can I ask you why you would associate flyback converters with a Meyer cell? There is no short across the cap on a flyback and also the Meyer series VIC has no load outside of the cap.


Ravenous Emu

RE: Meyer cell, stopping current flowing in both directions.
« Reply #4, on March 24th, 2013, 04:17 PM »Last edited on March 24th, 2013, 04:26 PM by Ravenous Emu
Quote from nav on March 24th, 2013, 01:01 PM
Hi Rav,
TY for the link. Can I ask you why you would associate flyback converters with a Meyer cell? There is no short across the cap on a flyback and also the Meyer series VIC has no load outside of the cap.
You're welcome.

Yes, the only reason I bring it up is that Stan's simple schematic resembles the look of a flyback converter circuit.  That is why I mentioned it.

This link is a little more descriptive of the overall effect.  Plus gives a detailed explanation of the overall operation.  Solid Info.
http://www.sci-experiments.com/HighVoltagePulser/Flyback%20Converter.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flyback_converter
"The flyback converter is an isolated power converter, therefore the isolation of the control circuit is also needed. The two prevailing control schemes are voltage mode control and current mode control (in the majority of cases current mode control needs to be dominant for stability during operation). Both require a signal related to the output voltage. There are two common ways to generate this voltage. The first is to use an optocoupler on the secondary circuitry to send a signal to the controller. The second is to wind a separate winding on the coil and rely on the cross regulation of the design."

Gunther Rattay


Max Hydroxy

RE: Meyer cell, stopping current flowing in both directions.
« Reply #6, on September 10th, 2013, 06:00 PM »
Hey Guys Iam looking for a link called "Disassociation of Water" anyone can point me in the right direction??

Lynx

RE: Meyer cell, stopping current flowing in both directions.
« Reply #7, on September 11th, 2013, 12:54 AM »
Quote from Max Hydroxy on September 10th, 2013, 06:00 PM
Hey Guys Iam looking for a link called "Disassociation of Water" anyone can point me in the right direction??
Is it a thread or post or attachment on this forum?
Couldn't find such a thread title, OTOH there's a whole bunch of posts with the word Disassociation in them though.