does resistance in a transformer transfer into flux?

Belfior

does resistance in a transformer transfer into flux?
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If my primary coil in a ferrite core transformer has high impedance, does this actually mean that I need to push a lot of power into that coil and that in turn transfers into a lot of flux inside the core?

Just trying to think out of the box on how to maximize the gain I get in L2

So longer L1, smaller gauge, bigger circumference and loop spacing gives me more impedance right?

Will I do better with high freq and air core?

Lynx

Re: does resistance in a transformer transfer into flux?
« Reply #1,  »
Ohmic resistance turns into heat, nothing else.
When you say impedance, would that be the resulting impedance at a given frequency, including the inductive reactive resistance in the calculation?

Belfior

Re: does resistance in a transformer transfer into flux?
« Reply #2,  »
Quote from Lynx on May 13th, 01:08 PM
Ohmic resistance turns into heat, nothing else.
When you say impedance, would that be the resulting impedance at a given frequency, including the inductive reactive resistance in the calculation?
Yes. Anything to make it harder for the current to pass through the coil and when the supply has to push more current in, that would result in more flux inside the core. Multilayer coil also works just fine

patrick1

Re: does resistance in a transformer transfer into flux?
« Reply #3,  »
Quote from Lynx on May 13th, 01:08 PM
Ohmic resistance turns into heat, nothing else.
When you say impedance, would that be the resulting impedance at a given frequency, including the inductive reactive resistance in the calculation?
also the permeability of the core, - and note the random iron filings i coughed up onto transformer.

and yes resistance is bad.  i should use less of it. - but perversely transistors like it.

Lynx

Re: does resistance in a transformer transfer into flux?
« Reply #4,  »
Quote from Belfior on May 14th, 01:37 PM
Yes. Anything to make it harder for the current to pass through the coil and when the supply has to push more current in, that would result in more flux inside the core. Multilayer coil also works just fine
As for inductive loads (coils/ballasts, motors, etc) one way to make it harder for the current to pass through the coil would be to up the frequency.
so when the supply has to push more current in, besides lowering the frequency, upping the voltage would also work, perhaps even a healthy mix between the two?

Belfior

Re: does resistance in a transformer transfer into flux?
« Reply #5,  »
Hmm ok high voltage and high freq. Starts to sound very familiar...

If I drop the core I'm suddenly at Don Smith's build...

Lynx

Re: does resistance in a transformer transfer into flux?
« Reply #6,  »
Quote from Belfior on May 15th, 10:29 AM
Hmm ok high voltage and high freq.
To up the current: High voltage and/or low frequency
To down the current: Low voltage and/or high frequency.

Sorry if I was unclear.

Matt Watts

Re: does resistance in a transformer transfer into flux?
« Reply #7,  »
Seems I asked a similar question once before...

I posed that if you have an inductor of 10 ohms resistance would this inductor behave differently than another inductor that has only 1 ohm resistance connected in series with a 9 ohm resistor.  The assumption is that the number of turns for each inductor is identical.

To me there is a consideration of distributed resistance at play here.  I tied to prove this to myself using some Nichrome wire, but the results were inconclusive.