advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit

Diplomacy

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #175,  »Last edited
Quote from evostars on July 7th, 04:54 AM
I do use speaker wire. pure copper for low resistance, and there are many thicknesses. I used 0.75mm2 before (and it works). but now use 1,5mm2 12,5 meter, total 25 meter. for increased capcitance and inductance, with decreased resistance.

I'm not familiar with turbine effect.
the impulse gives a longitudinal push (like a tsunami)

I'm still looking into the impulse speed, I read abou the 1uS in " cold war technology", made a video series about that book.

peak to peak? there is only one peak, as it is unipolar.
I measure (in my setup I just tuned with 330pF) a 750nS period, where the impulse goes from 0volts to -650V to 0 volts
I meant which way were you measuring the 1 microsecond time, you seem to be meaning that the time of the voltage rise has to be less than 1us, not the duration from pulse to pulse, thanks for clarification.

The turbine effect has to do with some of the replications of Tesla's boundary layer turbine, I have seen a few videos of people displaying an odd sound and massive acceleration after a point (usually in the tens of thousands of rpms, lower for broader turbine blades) so they can do something very similar to your work where a fairly small input brings the turbine up to a speed where there is a sudden disproportionate voltage/pressure rise.

I think the transition point is when it goes from merely being a spinning fluid (whether air or aether) to this vortex effect.

I bring this up, not to distract from your work, but to present a slower speed example of the same phenomena in a fluid of differing density.


https://youtu.be/XVW44ZZa62Q?t=67

I would compare the portion before the jump to pulses too slow to achieve the effect you are creating, they still accelerate the system, but nothing too exotic.

At about 1:42 in the video the air powered Tesla turbine crosses the 50,000 rpm mark and suddenly accelerates by more than ten thousand rpms in a very short span.

I think this is the same fluid dynamic effect your hairpin circuit is causing, but you are doing this with a much more tenuous fluid than air so the cycle times have to be all the faster.

This suggests to me that the turn-on delay and the rise time of the MOSFET are the most important timing factors of a device using these principles. It is my hypothesis that a slower overall frequency might be fine so long as the rise time is still short enough and the pulses are kept sharp enough. I think the duration required is inversely proportional to the mass, where a larger mass can have a longer pulse rise time and still get the desirable effect.

I have found your posts very helpful, thank you.

evostars

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #176,  »
thank you Diplomacy for reminding me of the Tesla turbine.

I have been intrigued by that patent/device.
It shows resemblance with the stacked pancake coils.
I have wondered about the connection between the turbine and the pancake coils.

also because there are 2 patents for the same basic device. one patent is the turbine, the other patent is the generator.

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #177,  »Last edited
The new  batteries are charging.
4x 8.4V (parallel) and 1x 12V
making around 21V for the SiC gate driver.

1200V impulses... wonder how that is going to turn out. don't even have a decent probe for those voltages.

connected the batteries to the gate driver.
I measure 23.45V dc. that should work fine.
but a zener for protection of the isolated gate driver IC might be needed.

the Ni-MH 9v batteries are charged to 10V
but they are labeled 8.4V 270mAh
that cant be right.. can it?

I can now start testing with the 1200V SiC mosfet
 :clap2:

 20190709_154747.jpg - 1471.4 kB, 2560x1440, viewed 6 times.

Longitudinal waves confirmed
« Reply #178,  »
Mark S used to work at Berkeley University particle accelerator.

We have been in contact via my YouTube channel.

he has replicated my radiant power circuit,
and made a faraday cage around L3.

He confirmed the energy passed through the faraday cage.
This is great news.

see attached screen shot.
the full message can be found in the comment section of my  radiant power video

this opens the door to (very efficient) longitudinal Radio

 Screenshot_20190709-231742_YouTube.jpg - 341.64 kB, 1080x1920, viewed 13 times.


namirha

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #179,  »Last edited
Quote from Diplomacy on July 7th, 06:38 PM
...https://youtu.be/XVW44ZZa62Q

I would compare the portion before the jump to pulses too slow to achieve the effect you are creating, they still accelerate the system, but nothing too exotic.

At about 1:42 in the video the air powered Tesla turbine crosses the 50,000 rpm mark and suddenly accelerates by more than ten thousand rpms in a very short span.
GOLDEN RATIO

PHIve

5

https://open-source-energy.org/?topic=3005.0

Belfior

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #180,  »
Quote from evostars on July 9th, 03:41 PM
Mark S used to work at Berkeley University particle accelerator.

We have been in contact via my YouTube channel.

he has replicated my radiant power circuit,
and made a faraday cage around L3.

He confirmed the energy passed through the faraday cage.
This is great news.

see attached screen shot.
the full message can be found in the comment section of my  radiant power video

this opens the door to (very efficient) longitudinal Radio
So you think  the frequency is higher than the cage can catch or you are passing an impulse through the cage? I think Old Scientist in YT had similar tests.

evostars

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #181,  »
Quote from Belfior on July 10th, 03:24 AM
So you think  the frequency is higher than the cage can catch or you are passing an impulse through the cage? I think Old Scientist in YT had similar tests.
Old scientist, never used impulses.

It seems the longitudinal pressure has no interaction with anything, except a high impedance resonant coil, where the pressure can be " worked into".

It isn't transverse, its like giving a broomstick a push along the direction of its axis. "instant action at a distance"
The dielectric lines of force are connected between the resonant coils, and is the broomstick that gets the push from the impulse.
-1200V 500nS impulses from SiC mosfet
« Reply #182,  »
Wow.
I tested the SiC mosfet. didn't disappoint.
-1200V impulses 500nS duration at 101kHz.

My probe is 10:1 so the signal didn't fit on screen (80V max, +40V and -40V). I set the zero point on +80V (above screen)
The impulses reached the bottom of the screen, reaching the -40, so total of 120V x10= -1200V

Very impressive.
 And dangerous. :hide:
As the 2uF caps now also charge to 1200V. (I used 2 mur1660CT diodes in series, when I build the circuit)
That is a lot of energy.
 I DO NOT want to get zapped by that.
1,44 joule... that will hurt...
 :emperor:

I need to build some safety points into this circuit.
Also need to be able to add more caps to tune L2

I had the L3 coil unloaded on top of L2 with 25nF parallel tuned. didn't look at the voltage, but that must have been pretty impressive also.

Belfior

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #183,  »
Quote from evostars on July 11th, 01:58 PM
Old scientist, never used impulses.

It seems the longitudinal pressure has no interaction with anything, except a high impedance resonant coil, where the pressure can be " worked into".

It isn't transverse, its like giving a broomstick a push along the direction of its axis. "instant action at a distance"
The dielectric lines of force are connected between the resonant coils, and is the broomstick that gets the push from the impulse.
If there is no interaction with anything but the coil, is this the methods Tesla used to transmit energy?

haxar

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #184,  »
Quote from Belfior on July 14th, 01:31 PM
If there is no interaction with anything but the coil, is this the methods Tesla used to transmit energy?
Yes. LMD waves pass through a Faraday cage.

A Faraday cage can only shield against TEM waves.

evostars

longitudinal magneto dielectric resonance
« Reply #185,  »
there are apparently 2 kinds of resonance.
1 is transverse Elctro magnetic. With current and voltage out of phase (no power)

the other is longitudinal magneto dielectric (As Eric Dollard called it) with current and voltage in phase (power)
anomaly: Fan drops in speed
« Reply #186,  »
I'm playing around with the SiC mosfet, and something is bothering me.
I also happens with the irfp460 mosfets.

When I dial in a frequency (that lights the bulb on L3) the cooling fan of the mosfets drops in RPM.

The fan is powered by 12V, generated by a buck converter from the supplied DC power.
The buck converter doesnt drop in voltage, it is set to 12V and stays there.
The only other power drain is the 5V input of the isolated gate driver IC (12v converted to 5V). Which almost doesn't draw power. it does show a slight drop in voltage, but something like 4,97V to 4,85V (from memory) just a slight drop.

Why is the fan speed dropping, at these specific frequencies?
 
It's a strange anomaly that I can't answer.
insight. how to impulse the resonant coil (which side)
« Reply #187,  »Last edited
I realised something important.
I played with the resonant L2 coil, and how its setup.
What I tried is 2 things.
1: impulse and resonant sine on the same side (inside rim) of the bifilar coil. outside rim doesn't change voltage
2: impulse on one side (outside rim) and resonant sine, on the inside rim.  both sides change voltage.

First I worked with 1 then I thought 2 is better. but it isn't.
the 1 is best. both impulse and sine on inside rim. outside rim not changing.
I will need to make another circuit board and design it this way, so the tuning caps are on the other side.

edit:
 maybe just another brain fart. both setups change polarity, important to understand is the dielectric field strength and polarity, comes from voltage difference over both ends of the coil.
With that in mind, since the coils are stacked, It makes sense to keep the changing voltage on one side of the coil, while the other end is stable in voltage (positive dc offset). so setup 1 it is.

this way the L2 facing L3 is changing voltage. the dielectric field of L2 is coupled with the dielectric field of L3. so when L2 changes by the impulse, L3 "feels" it directly

Also... VR is finally working again, I now can record proper videos in VR to explain into detail how these field dynamics work. This is also the reason of the insight. Seeing the fields in 3d really has opened my eyes. I hope the videos will open many more eyes.

reply 187  page 8... man this is becoming a long list. Glad I placed some important notes on different topics (health benefits page).

 2 setups.png - 19.93 kB, 954x466, viewed 3 times.

 stacked coils side view.png - 19.95 kB, 567x454, viewed 2 times.

designing new circuit board
« Reply #188,  »
I will use the 1200V SiC diodes on this board.
layout is placing the tuning caps on the impulse side.

also made the dc offset cap triple in size, I noticed the dc voltage fluctuated to much. Now its as large as the other. 2uF (3x 680nF)

 20190716_133353.jpg - 1535.38 kB, 2560x1440, viewed once.

teflon silver coated copper wire, for impulse path
« Reply #189,  »
title says all

 20190716_193921.jpg - 1786.64 kB, 2560x1440, viewed 2 times.

almost finished
« Reply #190,  »Last edited
only need safety discharge points for the caps

You can see some extra caps.
The dc offset cap was a single 680nF, but I noticed the dc voltage went up and down, so I tripled it to 2uF.

 20190716_230122.jpg - 1340.57 kB, 2560x1440, viewed 2 times.

unbalanced capacitor plates
« Reply #191,  »Last edited
Im still playing with thomas townsend browns remark, of the capacitor plates needing to be unbalanced. one big, one small plate. together making one cap.
and the force acting towards the smaller plate.

the 2 windings of the bifilar coil act as the plates. changing one winding in size doesn't make sense.
But changing the voltage on one side does make sense.

the dielectric field lines of force are between the windings due to the voltage difference between them.

When resonant, with one end grounded, only one side of the coil, the other windig, is changing polarity. (sine wave).

the impulse creates a unipolar change in the dielectric field, if the voltage is negative enough.

now take in mind the L2 and L3 also are dielectricly coupled. (and out of phase)
So when the L2 is impulsed, on the side that is facing L3, the L3 coil notices the sudden change in the dielectric field, as it is connected to L2.

This is the longitudinal push that is able to move through a faraday cage.

Another thought that lingers, is, if the ground connection is being influenced. If the earth itself, as a dielctric field, is being influenced by these impulses
first test successfull
« Reply #192,  »
I tested the setup, and it works. I need to get used to this setup again, where the impulse enters the resonant sine wave at the same side of the coil (inside rim).

It is nice to have both sine and impulse together, as i now only need one probe to measure them both.

I Forgot, that the impulse won't drop below the dc offset base line. I need to think about that, understand it.

Most important, the resonant sine wave, now is amplified by the impulse, I'm getting much higher resonant voltages, basically double the impulse voltage. so, 1200V impulse=2400V peak to peak sine. (haven't tried it so high). The resonant currents, will also be high this way, as the voltage is transformed into current.

So to work with this setup, its really important to keep a load (L3+lamp) on L2.

The Fan still drops in power. maybe, this is due to a shortcut from the fan to the radiator, which is connected to the drain.
I really need to check this, and fix it. the DC supply (connected to drain) feeds my non isolated buck converter, making 12V for the fan (and feeding 5V). somehow, the fan looses voltage, and drops in power. where is this voltage going?
fluctuating ground voltage
« Reply #193,  »Last edited
I measured ground, and I need to do it again.
because it fluctuated.
and not a little bit. like. 0.5V
but more like 50V (sine)
This is from memory (did a quick test before I had to leave).
 
If this is true, the explanation could be the inertia of the aether is being used to push against. and instead of the aether moving, with a steady solid ground voltage.

it is a steady solid aether, with a ground voltage that is being  moved.

This is brings back to mind, Nikola Tesla's biggest tower. that did the same.

If all this is true. than it makes sense to put a diode in the  path to the resonant coil that is being impulsed.
to stop the ground voltage from fluctuating. So the Aether will be put into motion.

This asks for a proper measurement.

edit : nope. false alarm. at time of impulse there is a 7v peak to peak ringing on the ground, but no 50V sine wave. this isn't unusual.
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #194,  »
testing with new circuit.
l1(bottom) l2(middle) l3 (top) stacked with distance between them.

impulse is totally rippled.
22W input 28W bulp is pretty lit
39kHz  with 50nF on l2 and 23nf on L3

all coils equal size, 2x12.5m 1.5mm2 with center hole.

yellow = l2 voltage, ripple is back emf
blue is l3 voltage.

 20190717_221342.jpg - 3763.28 kB, 4032x3024, viewed once.

 20190717_221316.jpg - 3405.79 kB, 4032x3024, viewed 0 times.

 20190717_221310.jpg - 4289.53 kB, 4032x3024, viewed once.

 20190717_221323.jpg - 3269.83 kB, 4032x3024, viewed 2 times.

poofff
« Reply #195,  »
OOps :-/

I played with my new L1 coil (5mm silicone between windings),
coupled to L2, I was looking for the current reduction. already had, it, but tried a variance, and I know when the coil isn't tuned proper (and it wasn't) the negative back EMF comes out on the other side as a positive spike.

Since I had the voltage way up, the spikes where about -1100V 600nS

Tuning it down, suddenly the current draw of the power supply went up (4,5A) I switched it off, but was to late. I saw something in the back of my power supply spark and poof... just before I turned it off
Luckily it has 2 channels, and I will probably be able to fix it. :cleaning:

In the future, I will use a diode between the V+ and the circuit, so if a positive spike passes through the coil (while tuning) it won't enter into the power supply and blow it up... 2x mur1660CT in series to with stand the 1200V impulse possibility.

it happend, with the resonant side of L2 facing the impulse side of L1 (close coupled). This did seem to work. before I had L1 impulse side facing outwards (ground facing L2). this already gave good current reduction. only 0.3A at 32V while still having huge(1000V roughly) impulses, and resonant L2.
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #196,  »
I found the part already, A SMD capacitor between V+ and ground (inside power supply) blew up. This confirms my idea of having positive impulses entering the power supply. the capacitor was probably rated at 100V or less, and had to deal with the 1000V spikes and blew up.

Luckily the power supply still works.

The cap probably was to capture noise and ground it away. I could replace it, but won't ddo'nt have the smd part, I would need to take apart...   and probably there wont be no difference. if so I could still use the first channel.

But A 1200V blocking diode between V+ and circuit, is definitely needed, to prevent the positive impulses ruining the power supply.
Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #197,  »Last edited
Hmm power supply works, but circuit doesnt.
If I turn the square wave feeding the mosfet, on, the amps jump high.
must be something wrong with the gate drive circuit.
back to the work bench.

I just wanted to check out my 2 2.5mm2 coils, and see how low the impulse duration gets with these coils (lower than 450nS that I already got)

it seems like the mosfet can be turned on and off by the switch giving the 50%duty square wave.
but once its on, it should be turned off by the 50% duty. but doesnt. very strange.
I made this conclusion as the current jumps high, as it would do with constont current to the l1 coil.

I should test without L1 coil, and measure the signal across it, see if it is pulsing
but then the mosfet has no ground at the source...

Lynx

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #198,  »
Quote from evostars on July 22nd, 07:08 AM
it seems like the mosfet can be turned on and off by the switch giving the 50%duty square wave.
but once its on, it should be turned off by the 50% duty. but doesnt. very strange.
I can't remember if you had a resistor between gate and source, otherwize try connecting say a 1M Ohm resistor between G - S and see what gives.

evostars

Re: advancing the Solid state Tesla hairpin circuit
« Reply #199,  »
found the problem, both 1200V SiC mosfets are toast. both dead shorted out. going to replace them with the mur1660CT (2 in series).
 but, still dont see how it creates a short cut when the mosfet turns on. need to check the caps