Induction coil

freethisone

Induction coil
« on December 6th, 2012, 06:55 PM »
I was looking through some old book marks, and i found this dated improvement of induction coil.

now thats an inductor.  easy to make. if made by forum, i would like to see your results.

file is attached.:heart:

:angel::angel:

cheers.
RE: Induction coil
« Reply #1, on October 25th, 2013, 06:48 AM »Last edited on October 25th, 2013, 07:00 AM by freethisone

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPoeOBgupBUhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kqN7ihsOyM

this is sweet...:heart::heart:

in one of these videos he has a magnet on a string.   the coil it rests at 90 degrees from the table, and the string is suspended at 90 degrees from that.

there is a piston like motion it can be utilized. with a spring.  he tries to get the same results when the coil is flat on the table but he is boggled by the mind.

add paint..

this is essentially any planet system in space, there it is suspend from a string, and having two tensions on a spinning  gyroscope.  a spinning magnetic field. and an axis suspended in space.



securesupplies

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #2, on October 25th, 2013, 08:39 AM »
russ can you post winding construct of yours
dan

why are these coil better?

and can they be used for  water cell?

freethisone

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #3, on November 4th, 2013, 05:51 PM »
Magnetic core materials

Having no magnetically active core material (an "air core") provides very low inductance in most situations, so a wide range of high-permeability materials are used to concentrate the field. Most high-permeability material are ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic.
Soft iron

"Soft" (annealed) iron is used in magnetic assemblies, electromagnets and in some electric motors; and it can create a concentrated field that is as much as 50,000 times more intense than an air core.[2]

Iron is desirable to make magnetic cores, as it can withstand high levels of magnetic field without saturating (up to 2.16 teslas at ambient temperature.[3])

It is also used because, unlike "hard" iron, it does not remain magnetised when the field is removed, which is often important in applications where the magnetic field is required to be repeatedly switched.

Unfortunately, due to the electrical conductivity of the metal, at AC frequencies a bulk block or rod of soft iron can often suffer from large eddy currents circulating within it that waste energy and cause undesirable heating of the iron.
Laminated silicon steel
Main article: Silicon steel

Because iron is a relatively good conductor, it cannot be used in bulk form with a rapidly changing field, such as in a transformer, as intense eddy currents would appear due to the magnetic field, resulting in huge losses (this is used in induction heating).

Two techniques are commonly used together to increase the resistivity of iron: lamination and alloying of the iron with silicon.
Lamination
Typical EI Lamination.

Laminated magnetic cores are made of thin, insulated iron sheets, lying, as much as possible, parallel with the lines of flux. Using this technique, the magnetic core is equivalent to many individual magnetic circuits, each one receiving only a small fraction of the magnetic flux (because their section is a fraction of the whole core section). Because eddy currents flow around lines of flux, the laminations prevent most of the eddy currents from flowing at all, restricting any flow to much smaller, thinner and thus higher resistance regions. From this, it can be seen that the thinner the laminations, the lower the eddy currents.
Silicon alloying

A small addition of silicon to iron (around 3%) results in a dramatic increase of the resistivity, up to four times higher[citation needed]. Further increase in silicon concentration impairs the steel's mechanical properties, causing difficulties for rolling due to brittleness.

Among the two types of silicon steel, grain-oriented (GO) and grain non-oriented (GNO), GO is most desirable for magnetic cores. It is anisotropic, offering better magnetic properties than GNO in one direction. As the magnetic field in inductor and transformer cores is static (compared to that in electric motors), it is possible to use GO steel in the preferred orientation.
Carbonyl iron
Main article: carbonyl iron

Powdered cores made of carbonyl iron, a highly pure iron, have high stability of parameters across a wide range of temperatures and magnetic flux levels, with excellent Q factors between 50 kHz and 200 MHz. Carbonyl iron powders are basically constituted of micrometer-size spheres of iron coated in a thin layer of electrical insulation. This is equivalent to a microscopic laminated magnetic circuit (see silicon steel, above), hence reducing the eddy currents, particularly at very high frequencies.

A popular application of carbonyl iron-based magnetic cores is in high-frequency and broadband inductors and transformers.
Iron powder

Powdered cores made of hydrogen reduced iron have higher permeability but lower Q. They are used mostly for electromagnetic interference filters and low-frequency chokes, mainly in switched-mode power supplies.
Ferrite
Main article: Ferrite (magnet)

Ferrite ceramics are used for high-frequency applications. The ferrite materials can be engineered with a wide range of parameters. As ceramics, they are essentially insulators, which prevents eddy currents, although losses such as hysteresis losses can still occur.
Vitreous Metal

Amorphous metal is a variety of alloys that are non-crystalline or glassy. These are being used to create high efficiency transformers. The materials can be highly responsive to magnetic fields for low hysteresis losses and they can also have lower conductivity to reduce eddy current losses. China is currently making wide spread industrial and power grid usage of these transformers for new installations.
RE: Induction coil
« Reply #4, on November 5th, 2013, 03:15 AM »
the a vector?:s



/watch?v=iJsVSMQqCOM
RE: Induction coil
« Reply #5, on November 5th, 2013, 06:20 PM »Last edited on November 5th, 2013, 07:44 PM by freethisone
Were are we at  from here? an inductor that gets hot all on its own. thats what the Hutchenson effect is.

That tough little element, beaten to a jelly meant. Maxwell.

it is iron. we win.. problem solved, the reason for the inductor, taking on the dipole shuttling it, and vibrating it. it gets hot.


so yes mimic the inductor frequency of iron, with sound, and u to can melt steel.

take a 3 foot inductor, set it up with a secondary wrap of heaver wire a 1/4 or less the size of the rod., cover the rod completely with the fine wire primary.

set it up in oscillation with a scope.

get a crystal set and hit the same frequency. walla melted steel.. use same size mass to melt. you already have its frequency..

or you can ask John..
:P:P:P

if you want this free energy go big. 6 to 7 feet 4 to 6 inches thick iron rod,or wire bundles of steel, making up a 6 foot 4 inch fat bundle for your coil.. making 4 will cost a lot of money, but for 3 grand you may end up with all the energy you could need... Iron water pipe perhaps, go to a scrap yard...

It is in itself, a motionless generator. cheers.  How did we forget?

Matt Watts

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #6, on November 5th, 2013, 08:30 PM »Last edited on November 5th, 2013, 08:56 PM by Matt Watts
Looks a lot like the Delay Lenz Effect that J.L. Naudin worked on as well as the Thane Heins Bi-Toroid Transformer (BiTT).

Self running though...   We'll have to see about that one.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oiQClPZZYDc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6kPOw0d0j4E

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6cDc8k-t9w

freethisone

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #7, on November 6th, 2013, 03:36 AM »Last edited on November 6th, 2013, 03:58 AM by freethisone
Quote from Matt Watts on November 5th, 2013, 08:30 PM
Looks a lot like the Delay Lenz Effect that J.L. Naudin worked on as well as the Thane Heins Bi-Toroid Transformer (BiTT).

Self running though...   We'll have to see about that one.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oiQClPZZYDc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6kPOw0d0j4E

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6cDc8k-t9w
Self runner, i took a picture.:heart:

at 1min 36 seconds you can see he used a sires of shorted coils, on his armauture?

nice, he made  a moving  changing asymmetric  magnetic flux. I also like how he mentioned Tomas Bearden..

/watch?v=oiQClPZZYDc


to shuttle the lag flux around, for a simple term.:cool:

Matt Watts

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #8, on November 6th, 2013, 08:06 AM »Last edited on November 6th, 2013, 08:24 AM by Matt Watts
Look at this schematic closely; notice the windings on the rotor oppose each other.  One would think the magnetic field in the rotor core would be zero because of this.  Instead (due to superposition) it is referred to as a pinch zone.  I suppose this creates some sort of wormhole where the Dirac Sea can be accessed.
[attachment=4536]

Also notice the stator coils could easily be replaced by permanent magnets.

I can't for the life of me see how this could possibly work.  The only thing I can think of is where the rotor shaft goes through the rotor core, it must change the aspect ratio, but we have no idea what those physical dimensions are.
RE: Induction coil
« Reply #9, on November 6th, 2013, 08:29 AM »Last edited on November 6th, 2013, 08:57 AM by Matt Watts
Quote from freethisone on November 6th, 2013, 03:36 AM
at 1min 36 seconds you can see he used a sires of shorted coils, on his armauture?

nice, he made  a moving  changing asymmetric  magnetic flux. I also like how he mentioned Tomas Bearden..
What I don't understand here is that Tom Bearden worked with Frank Sweet, so why on earth would Tom attempt to build the MEG when Frank already had the VTA?  Doesn't add up.

Some more Sweet info:
http://www.rexresearch.com/sweet/1nothing.htm

freethisone

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #10, on November 6th, 2013, 10:27 PM »Last edited on November 6th, 2013, 10:27 PM by freethisone
/watch?v=lWM3tA9mZ0Azero fissil fuel are u with us.

/watch?v=lWM3tA9mZ0http://open-source-energy.org/forum/images/smilies/smile.gifA
RE: Induction coil
« Reply #11, on November 7th, 2013, 06:43 PM »Last edited on November 7th, 2013, 07:07 PM by freethisone
/watch?v=f0fwjY6_-1M

/watch?v=bJdLA4w3w58

ok folk time to put the hard work to the test.


Matt why does this work?

he has a high resistance .  so that means work can be done.

how can it be inproved? :P in any nuber of ways.:dodgy:



Quote from freethisone on November 5th, 2013, 03:15 AM
the a vector?:s



/watch?v=iJsVSMQqCOM
this is the similarity i want to show. at Bohm effect is magnetic B field is completely contained inside the medium or iron core. there you see in the patent similarity.  a iron core coil with an outer iron core. ok same way Ed lee did it. core wire, inner core winding connects to outer iron core. second iron core.  outer core north, inner core south. high magnetic flux = borm effect. does that sound about right to you?

next length of wire, 1500 feet is a good number to shoot for as a coil. as an inductor we put a high resistance between the circuit it powers 1500 watt for example. a good number to shoot for.

at 3 min 38 second self assisted oscillator movie. we have the coil in question. he needs four  sets or at least 2 setups what he has there.  at 6 min 48 seconds 2 pictures of a circuit. one looks like a spark gap is used to shuttle the flux around, have a lag time. at 6 min 54 sec a Tesla looking induction coil, a one wire motor perhaps.

we know were we can charge caps in this circuit diagram. should know..

Jeff Nading

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #12, on November 7th, 2013, 08:22 PM »
Zero made one of those copper wire wound magnet thingies with the little pig tail, did not work.

Matt Watts

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #13, on November 7th, 2013, 09:36 PM »
Quote from Jeff Nading on November 7th, 2013, 08:22 PM
Zero made one of those copper wire wound magnet thingies with the little pig tail, did not work.
I think the proper terminology is, it's a hoax.  How would I know that?  I've built a few just to test myself I reckon.  Video editing software these days can do wonderful special effects.  Most teenagers are now able to create videos that would stump many undiscerning adults.  We really have to be on our toes and at least fundamentally understand something before we give a video any credence.  It's too bad--welcome to the digital world where everything can be manipulated.

freethisone

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #14, on November 8th, 2013, 01:36 AM »Last edited on November 8th, 2013, 01:39 AM by freethisone
Quote from Matt Watts on November 7th, 2013, 09:36 PM
Quote from Jeff Nading on November 7th, 2013, 08:22 PM
Zero made one of those copper wire wound magnet thingies with the little pig tail, did not work.
I think the proper terminology is, it's a hoax.  How would I know that?  I've built a few just to test myself I reckon.  Video editing software these days can do wonderful special effects.  Most teenagers are now able to create videos that would stump many undiscerning adults.  We really have to be on our toes and at least fundamentally understand something before we give a video any credence.  It's too bad--welcome to the digital world where everything can be manipulated.
well i think the pig tail thing is a hoax also. but the only way it could work is with a high  resistance.

look at the set up with the microwave coil. he is close. but the reason his works is because of the length of wire used. read the patent.. cheers

Matt Watts

Negative Resistance
« Reply #16, on November 8th, 2013, 07:54 AM »Last edited on November 8th, 2013, 08:03 AM by Matt Watts
So he adds a spark gap and power output/input ratio increases considerably.

Okay, let me add my two cents here.  We know that a plasma actually creates the conditions for a negative resistor.  I have said this before:  What has a lower resistance than a direct short?  I plasma arc.  Tesla also described this as a disruptive gap.

We also know from Paul Babcock that radiant energy is collected in a magnetic coil, but can only be accessed via a plasma arc.  So combining these two pieces of information, exactly leads to what is demonstrated in the video.

Clearly then, the next two steps are:
[list=1]
  • Show a power output/input ratio greater than one.
  • Close-loop the system and show self running operation.
[/list]If the above cannot be done, then we can suspect what Floyd Sweet mentioned about negative and positive electricity annihilating each other to be true.  This means we will need dual systems in order to loop, where one of them takes positive electricity and outputs negative (cold) electricity and the other system does just the opposite.  Tie the two systems together in series.

So yeah, maybe we really are "almost there".

heatlocke

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #17, on November 8th, 2013, 11:07 AM »
This is heavy stuff. I`m trying to keep up.

freethisone

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #18, on November 8th, 2013, 01:51 PM »Last edited on November 8th, 2013, 01:52 PM by freethisone
/watch?v=zYlsqOK5BiYlets see what we can learn here about wire length. also how that may effect oscillations of the big iron coil, how should we add the semi conductor material? to get a high  lag time of magnetic flux in a  wire.

were shall we send that energy? up a flag pole, then into a cap?  

 Round, and round she goes lol:D...

Jeff Nading

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #19, on November 8th, 2013, 02:32 PM »
Quote from Matt Watts on November 7th, 2013, 09:36 PM
Quote from Jeff Nading on November 7th, 2013, 08:22 PM
Zero made one of those copper wire wound magnet thingies with the little pig tail, did not work.
I think the proper terminology is, it's a hoax.  How would I know that?  I've built a few just to test myself I reckon.  Video editing software these days can do wonderful special effects.  Most teenagers are now able to create videos that would stump many undiscerning adults.  We really have to be on our toes and at least fundamentally understand something before we give a video any credence.  It's too bad--welcome to the digital world where everything can be manipulated.
This is to funny Matt, I to built one knowing it to be "more than likely" a hoax, but did not want to admit it until someone else did. Kids these days. :D:D:D:D:P:P:P:P:P

Matt Watts

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #20, on November 8th, 2013, 02:44 PM »
Quote from heatlocke on November 8th, 2013, 11:07 AM
This is heavy stuff. I`m trying to keep up.
Yeah, it can be.

I've heard a lot of talk about "cold electricity".  If there is such a thing, my guess would be that it behaves much like normal "hot" electricity, only the electron spin is reversed.  So the electrons still carry current and the circuits still appear to work identical, but the electrons themselves are rotating backwards.  In the case of Floyd's statement about annihilation, it would make sense if two currents of opposite electron spin came into contact with each other, they would react and cancel all electron flow.

A typical voltmeter indicates the polarity/direction of the electron flow, but it has no means to indicate the spin of those electrons.  What we need is a device that is able to determine the electron spin, because right now we can't determine which type of current is flowing, unlike a magnet where we can at least figure out which end is north or south.

This is all just my theory for now and could be complete rubbish.  If it is true though, it would explain such things as "cold" electricity and the inability of close-looping some kind of an energy device.  I guess what is needed are some solid experiments that would prove/disprove it.

freethisone

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #21, on November 8th, 2013, 03:47 PM »Last edited on November 8th, 2013, 03:50 PM by freethisone
Quote from freethisone on November 8th, 2013, 01:51 PM
/watch?v=zYlsqOK5BiYlets see what we can learn here about wire length. also how that may effect oscillations of the big iron coil, how should we add the semi conductor material? to get a high  lag time of magnetic flux in a  wire.

were shall we send that energy? up a flag pole, then into a cap?  

 Round, and round she goes lol:D...
/watch?v=atlnVNy0IDE:D

keep it going.
/watch?v=2kOQr7hZA70

Matt Watts


freethisone


Matt Watts

RE: Induction coil
« Reply #24, on November 9th, 2013, 09:24 AM »
Quote from freethisone on November 9th, 2013, 06:20 AM
does his wave look familiar?

so we learn why it is this way. Is that correct?
You mean Stan Meyer's step charging effect?

To me what you have shown so far is that it's not a step charge at all, it's a waveform with feedback by way of a negative resistor, so each cycle increases in amplitude.  Therefore, it's a run-away condition and will continue to increase until there is a catastrophic breakdown in the water that shorts it out; after which it will start all over.

But the main thing here is that a negative resistor allows a HUGE current flow which is completely contrary to everyone's thinking that Stan is splitting water with voltage.