Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication

securesupplies

Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #25,  »
new
Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #26,  »
Materials
The optical properties of the lining of the sphere greatly affect its accuracy. Different coatings must be used at visible, infrared and ultraviolet wavelengths. High-powered illumination sources may heat or damage the coating, so an integrating sphere will be rated for a maximum level of incident power. Various coating materials are used.



For visible-spectrum light, early experimenters used a deposit of magnesium oxide, and barium sulfate also has a usefully flat reflectance over the visible spectrum. Various proprietary PTFE compounds are also used for visible light measurements. Finely-deposited gold is used for infrared measurements.



An important requirement for the coating material is the absence of fluorescence. Fluorescent materials absorb short-wavelength light and re-emit light at longer wavelengths. Due to the many scatterings this effect is much more pronounced in an integrating sphere than for materials irradiated normally.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrating_sphere



Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #27,  »
A While Back Max Posted some  tests and a 3d printer file I cc it here as it is good work and
important part of the puzzle we now call a proven fact Stanley A Meyer Told the Truth

Dan
Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #28,  »
Note from Max

an open sourced, cheap 3D printed integrating sphere.

more pics and video of it soon.

matter hacker black has let me down. first part of the spool looked great, then the middle of it is a different crappy gray funky printing crap. OH WELL! i am painting the sphere anyway.

the inside top of the sphere was a little droopy on the print, so i use a wood burner iron to smooth the plastic out. the iron has a V shape and works well for this. then some sandable primer and clean it up, then the finish in gloss white.

you can see the LED in the one end and there will be a sensor at the other end.

patrick1

Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #29,  »
printing like that is amazing without supports.  no chance on a basic machine without years of experience

securesupplies

Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #30,  »
lol that is a basic machine with no experience lol 

it is childs play  look up markforged carbon fibre 3d printing if you want the advanced mans stuff
Re: Spherical Resonant Cavity Replication
« Reply #31,  »
3D MAX PRINITNG

https://x3dtechnology.com

Drawing for 11 cell inject and many other parts are posted you can print them right now at home , buy a printer from ebay or amazon