The Water Bridge

~Russ


gpssonar

Re: The Water Bridge
« Reply #1, on November 12th, 2016, 04:00 PM »
That is cool, I find it interesting that the charge in the stick can pull the water bridge up and down like that. Very interesting.

~Russ

Re: The Water Bridge
« Reply #2, on November 12th, 2016, 04:20 PM »
Quote from gpssonar on November 12th, 2016, 04:00 PM
That is cool, I find it interesting that the charge in the stick can pull the water bridge up and down like that. Very interesting.
yeah exactly, and when i was not having a bridge i would charge the stick by dipping it in the + or -  and effect the way the water reacted to it.

just thought it was quite interesting :)

~Russ

mercury101

Re: The Water Bridge
« Reply #3,  »
There may be a hint when you look at two earth magnets with an air gap and liquid gasses like nitrogen, hydrogen, and liquid oxygen. Liquid oxygen is the one that forms a bridge between the two earth magnets. The video can be found on you tube. I have had no luch so far posting links or videos yet.

Merc

Lynx

Re: The Water Bridge
« Reply #4,  »
Quote from mercury101 on November 15th, 2016, 06:08 PM
I have had no luch so far posting links or videos yet.

Merc
If you find some interesting video you'd like to post just post the link to it as is and PM me or any staff and we'll see about making it appear as planned in your post ;)

~Russ


haxar

Re: The Water Bridge
« Reply #6,  »
Quote
yes says:
November 15, 2016 at 9:06 am

He should throw some dye in the water, see if it flows. Or even a pH sensitive dye to visualize water dissociation. Maybe add a detergent and see what reduced water tension does. As long as he uses non Ionic detergents, it shouldn’t affect conductivity too much.
http://hackaday.com/2016/11/15/make-water-bridges-with-high-voltages/#comment-3272167
Re: The Water Bridge
« Reply #7,  »
Also, how a magnet would influence the bridge.

Matt Watts


securesupplies

Re: The Water Bridge
« Reply #9,  »
question ca we use light to see if it is in fact hydrogen making the bridge  ? how can we tell