SEG Magnetization

d3x0r

SEG Magnetization
« on December 20th, 2015, 10:03 AM »Last edited on December 20th, 2015, 11:34 AM by ~Russ
re:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2wQZ1ZCsrRo
 (russ 12/20/2015)

There is this page...
http://www.thelivingmoon.com/41pegasus/02files/Searl_Effect_Generator.html

S. Gunnar Sandberg

"The Magnetic Field Configuration ~

Due to a combined DC and AC magnetising process, each magnet acquires a specific magnetic pole pattern recorded on two tracks consisting of a number of individual N-poles and S-poles, as illustrated in Figure 4.

Magnetic measurements have revealed that the poles are approximately one millimetre across and evenly spaced. It was also found that the pole density (x) --- defined as the total number of poles N per track divided by the circumference, pi D --- must be a constant factor specific for a particular generator. Thus:"

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So Maybe... was considering possible jigs; first probably wouldn't work... to make alternating fingers on the jig so one lands on the near edge, and the other on the far edge... but then the fingers that over-extend the edge (probably an inside/outside offset) would be nearer to each other on the sides so wouldn't end up passing through....

What about doing 2 passes - so you have longer fingers that line up on the edge... and flip the jig/magnet and turn it 1 phase off.... (however far that is)

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how long is the magnetizaiton pulse?  like how long is the X Killo-amps passing in the coil?

Back to the Gunnar page...


Recommended parameter values:

DC current, idc = 150 A to 180 A

AC current, iac = 0.1 to 0.2 A
Frequency, f = 1-3 MHz

At such low currents, the AC is going to have very little flux generation; and *I* would think would not influence the field noticably; from experimenting with Akula/Ruslan/Kapanadze generator coils, an AC pulse outside of a high current DC pulse has little notable effect...

But at Mhz the pulse is 300-1000nS in length... (up to 1uS) hence the question of how long is the pulse anyway in the existing DC only?


~Russ

Re: SEG Magnetization
« Reply #1, on December 20th, 2015, 11:37 AM »
Nice find on that one.

Talking to Jason Verbelli and he agrees that the Ac / Dc is used In The process.

ill share this link, thanks for posting!

~Russ


Matt Watts

Re: SEG Magnetization
« Reply #2, on January 5th, 2016, 03:54 AM »
Russ, I came across this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOJ_sFy6BQU

Quite interesting about the extra coils and frequencies Neal uses to "program" the magnet with a bubble in the middle.

~Russ

Re: SEG Magnetization
« Reply #5, on January 14th, 2016, 09:51 AM »
FYI because if the "wave" that is not really "smooth" it appears that it could be that there is just Manny magnets in a "halbach array"  and not a fundamental magnetizing process... However, its still a nice setup! ~Russ
Re: SEG Magnetization
« Reply #6, on January 14th, 2016, 10:24 AM »
Quote from Matt Watts on January 5th, 2016, 03:54 AM
Russ, I came across this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOJ_sFy6BQU

Quite interesting about the extra coils and frequencies Neal uses to "program" the magnet with a bubble in the middle.
Matt, from my testing , why the middle is has a " hole" is that the material was not saturated enough magnetize it.

that's why he stated that he can " move it around" with a magnet. because its UN-magnitized in the middle.

~Russ

d3x0r

Re: SEG Magnetization
« Reply #7, on February 7th, 2016, 05:06 PM »
Alternative windings which might also work...
https://www.facebook.com/r3x3d/media_set?set=a.641354565885972.1073741827.100000343030096&type=3 (step by step winding)

this was wound with just plastic weed whacker line.. but could be woud with say 12 guage wire.   If there was a slight gap, would get more invidual poles around the middle of it .... (might be rather low resistance though and need less voltage.



Can be wound without a former... it's really just once around, and once through....

Re: SEG Magnetization
« Reply #8, on February 7th, 2016, 05:16 PM »
Was watching something on Tokamak reactors...


which reminded me that maybe a small AC current can influence the DC ?  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tokamak