"Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community

Diadon

"Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« on June 26th, 2015, 02:36 AM »
 Hey everyone,
  I don't often post on forums, but out of the many forums on alternative energy, this is one of my favorites to read. It seems to be the most constructive of the bunch and I will tell you up front, if you have a critic, I am open to it. So don't be too shy to share :)

  So on that note, lets get started on some of the most mysterious and elusive of all alternative energy beasts... "Cold Fusion" Or better known now as LENR.   There are some basics in understanding of the supposed "strong nuclear forces" that are involved. To put it simply, there are spin potentials in what are called Protons and Neutrons. Here is the interesting thing to note, is that they are separated by (unknown medium) x at a distance of femtometer(fm)  or 1.0x10ⁿ15 . At roughly 0.7fm, the atomic nuclei or,  equal parts protons and neutrons, are repulsive from one another. This is commonly accepted theory but in no way am I say it is fact. The "electron shell" of an atom as well as the Heisenberg Uncertainty principle, are just ideas to explain that which is too small for us to perceive. We are unable to perceive the inner atomic structure, since we limit our perception to a designated speed limit of light. The generally accepted calculations are as follows. From ~.07fm to ~2.5fm the nuclear force is attracted to one another. Anything beyond 2.5fm become insignificant.... which is similar to coulombs of force and gravitational force. In regards to how they act on a spacial distance between denser bodies of energy. If the neutrons can be polarized to be opposite spin potential of the proton, fusion could happen. It is speculated that this polarization process happens in nature by extreme heat and pressure.

I believe, and this is quite a bold statement, that fusion is possible in a wide variety of parameters. I won't go too deep into hypothesis on what many others believe is happening.  The only statement I will write along the lines of theory, is that it seems very likly resonance can happen on many harmonic scales as well as many orders of magnitude. Time no longer becomes a factor, when you sing the notes into space. They are set a drift according to the moment you sang the note. The potential velocity of those sounds and there vibrations, are determined by the medium they move through. So what medium are we moving through?

   On a more logical note, I am currently testing different transitional metals and carbons to see if there are cheaper alternatives to Pd and Pt. Ni seems to be a relatively in-expensive choice currently. I have been researching material sciences for some time now and there are some alloys I believe could be very beneficial.  In there geometry, they have a fractal scalar geometry that is UN-repeating. These materials have been often called quasi-crystalline structures, or aerospace materials. The tricky part is finding a supplier for these alloys that will give samples in bulk.
   
  What is the purpose of all this fusion reactor stuff you may ask?  Think about this, if this technology is refined, we could create micro generation of power for every home. Slowly working our way out of this plutocratic society by changing how we operate as individuals. There are many problems with harvesting the energy influenced by fusions. The first and most important one being, how do you create a sustainable fusion environment. The second being, after a reactor can be sustained, how do we influence energy from the nuclear collisions? I have some answers to that second question on in a multitude of potentials. From turbines, Magneto Hydro Dynamic generation, and passive systems. More importantly simultaneously harmonizing the movement of potentials. I should not put the cart before the horse. We are limited only by the environment we pass through and our own personal potential to do so in the now.

  So lets share our unique spark to light the way. I will be working on a DIY LENR reactor this weekend. I don't have the best video editing software or fantastic equipment. So I will try to make it up in enthusiastic charm, or annoying geek depending on your perception ;) Either way, we most certainly will learn something.

 If you are new to this topic, I suggest looking into LENR for the basics. From the Fleischmann–Pons experiments to Mitsubishi Company. The list of companies,labs, and experimenters is extensive.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_fusion
 Though this exploration of fusion is not nearly the cost of the famous hot fusion reactors. Funding runs short in things designed for abundance. So our human energy need not be directed towards financial gain, as there is no profit in abundance. We should focus on harmonically interacting with the world, not dominating it don't you think?
If you are looking for more empirical data.

Here are a few scholarly articles as well as a video from a internet teacher/friend.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxVcLHOqfyE&index=2&list=PLjY6p4FarTojaB_Ogb4S7HRdu8M9-FzN9

http://coldfusionnow.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Tsyganov-Dubna-Talk.pdf

 I will try not to bombard you with too much scholarly articles. Right now my current slow going process is making whats called heavy water (more accurately semi-heavy water or HDO) Heavy water is also  known as  Hydrogen-2,2H or sometimes just D. This is done by slowly electrolyzing water down to the heavy water that occurs in roughly .001% of all water on earth. Basically for every 3200 Hydrogen molecules there is 1 Deuterium molecule. We are also setting up real time calorimetry data and going through a large learning curve on IC and DAQ stuff.

The beauty and mystery of hydrogen is that its elemental number represents everything . That number is 1... Proteus and its root protogonos, for which Rutherfurd named the hydrogen atom, speaks volumes in what hydrogen represents. The first born, adaptable to change, versatile, mutable, and capable of assuming many forms.

  Hopefully this was a decent opening topic for this section. Here is a quick video I did of some hydrodynamic plasma of NiTi. Its amazing to me that it reaches such high heat and creates an immense amount of light at such low power. When the reaction occurs the input power reduces to ~160 Watts in this experiment.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwUV2fFjrLo

Thanks for taking the time to read and I look forward to correspondence. Enjoy the present moments my friends
-Diadon (die-a-den) Its a weird name I know. ;)

kenssurplus

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #1, on June 26th, 2015, 09:56 AM »Last edited on June 26th, 2015, 02:46 PM
Hey Diadon, Welcome, and thanks for your great input into this field.

Before you go to wild with your star in a jar, please watch my video on electrolytic radiation here:
Glow plasma electrolysis radiation test

cold fuze glow plasma radiation test

I had another thread about it in the public member projects area, before the forum moved, but now I can't find it so this one will have to do.

Out-a-time again, talk later.

Lynx

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #2, on June 26th, 2015, 11:09 AM »
Quote from kenssurplus on June 26th, 2015, 09:56 AM
I had another thread about it in the public member projects area, before the forum moved, but now I can't find it so this one will have to do.
Which project would that be?
If it would have somehow disappeared chances are it could be filed in some backup.

kenssurplus

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #3, on June 26th, 2015, 02:38 PM »
Hi Lynx, I found it.  It was moved into the member's benches area. No big deal, just that I couldn't find it when I wanted to (you know, like if someone else cleans your house shop or lab for you - you have to relearn where everything is :-)

Lynx

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #4, on June 26th, 2015, 10:18 PM »
Alright :thumbsup:

Diadon

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #5, on June 26th, 2015, 11:29 PM »Last edited on June 26th, 2015, 11:31 PM
Thanks for the post kenssurplus. I am concerned with radiation a bit and I am on the look out for an affordable radiation detector. I am very limited in resource, so that one might be a while. I saw a smartphone auido jack attachment for cheap, but the reviews where not very comforting. I don't run long duration tests all that often. My longest is a 3 hour run until the electrode went molten and dripped into the bottom of my borosilicate glass. I chose borosilicate for its ability to absorb some radiation. Unfortunately, its a shot in the dark of how much its actually helping. That molten drip also happened to burn a small surface pit on the bottom. So , in the long term a ceramic will probably work much better. Thanks for taking the time to post and talk. There is a happy medium between current draw and surface area of the anode for greater efficiencies. There is most certainly a calculation for liters of water, moles of electrolyte, and surface of anode. I just don't know it yet or haven't found it ;)
Again thank you for the safety concern, it much appreciated and something that goes through my mind when I run the experiment.
Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #6, on June 27th, 2015, 01:14 AM »
 Alright then, round two and into the maze we travel deeper. I touched briefly on uncertainty and how it alludes to "electron shells" and "atomic nuclei" interactions. Now we will explore the probability of that uncertainty on the subatomic,or as I like to call it, the imaginary language of infinity. Schrödinger's equation beautifully expresses natures ability to change according to probability. Ultimately, this probability is uncertain, but patterns in nature are evident. This probability is deeply attached to not only a chance, but also a duality  that electrons move as particles and waves. Some have theorized in a matrix pattern. Some a scalar field pattern, which is my personal hypothesis. However, the probability that an electron interaction influence the nucleus of an atom, could theoretically be determined by surface area to instance (or site) excitation of particles. Or to put it dogmatically, particles influenced by waves, then creating waves to influence particles... I know its pretty much a snake eating its own tail.  Its possible that if the surface of an atom is excited to such an extreme degree, there could be a quantum leap into the internal structure of an atom. This is one theory that is seldom talked about, but has exciting implications on subatomic influencing or ordering. I will continue to post these little snips of experimental theory in hopes to open up dialogue with some of you fine gentlemen.

 A teacher can never teach, if he is not simultaneously learning.

Matt Watts

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #7, on June 27th, 2015, 05:39 AM »
Quote from Diadon on June 27th, 2015, 01:14 AM
his is one theory that is seldom talked about, but has exciting implications on subatomic influencing or ordering. I will continue to post these little snips of experimental theory in hopes to open up dialogue with some of you fine gentlemen.
There is another very rare school of thought on this topic.  That of W.B. Smith and the field fabric, composed of only three fields:  electric, magnetic and tempic.  It's this later field tempic, being responsible for entropy and any statistics based on time variation.  The true field that holds all combinations of the other fields together.  That which makes matter and energy possible.

I've harped on this for over a year now and no one seems to take to me serious--no one took W.B. Smith serious either, so I'm in good company.

Diadon

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #8, on June 27th, 2015, 02:45 PM »
That does not seem all that odd to me. Energy, frequency, and vibration and there associations with one another.
 W.B. Smith the Canadian UFOlogist? You have any links so I can take a quick read through of his work?

MongrelShark

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #9, on June 27th, 2015, 04:37 PM »Last edited on June 27th, 2015, 05:04 PM
Hi Diadon
Sweet looking forum, thanks for bringing it to my attention. This is my first post :D

I have been interested in LENR for a while too. Unfortunately it seems like its an expensive thing to research. As mentioned above there should be some basic safety measure taken during all experiments. Something else that is often missing from such experiments is a way to verify if a nuclear reaction has taken place at all.

The things I think need to be part of any LENR study are sadly almost never present during the bulk of the demonstrations and experiments I have seen and it raises many concerns.

What happens if you get a hot reaction by accident? While this should be fairly hard to do. I cant help but think of the quote: Its hard to make things foolproof, because fools are so ingenious.

The other thing I find myself wondering every time I see a kitchen experiment setup. Is how is this person intending to verify that a LENR has taken place should they succeed? How do they intend to test their results?

A quick google had me looking at ten of thousands of dollars in lab equipment I don’t have the space for. Fortunately all is not lost.
For a fairly reasonable cost decent measurements and testing can be done by the DIYer

The simplest and cheapest and most widely accepted ways to deal with these two significant hurdles is to use two bits of gear that are complex by nature.
One is a radiation counter. Ideally one that wont be set off by EM from arcs, sparks, and HF radio stuff. Which narrows it down to the geiger-muller tube method. Even then, I think its not completely protected from interference from many proposed LENR device. But at least safety can be addressed. If you get any significant readings on the Geiger you know you need to protect yourself and the local environment. Regardless of if you have nuclear radiation or EM. The alternative involves using film slides, which could at least monitor personal exposure. I don’t know how expensive this is or if it can be DIY'ed. Failing that one could always wait for ones hair to start falling out. :huh:

Gieger Counter:
Fortunately ebay comes to the rescue. Provided you can solder and handle a little Arduino code. I got one of these a while back.
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Arduino-IDE-compatible-DIY-kit-Geiger-nuclear-radiation-counter-w-LCD-/151676234158?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item23509ba9ae
Do note that the geiger-muller tube (the sensor part) is not included. The seller does offer a few that can be calibrated from stock code. Or you are free to shop around. I rarely endorse ebay sellers, but I feel this one is worth a good word. They where very helpful when I asked a few questions about tubes etc  and where happy to provide technical details, construction advice etc etc. Its not a super store or anything. I think its a high school or Uni student trying to make a little cash to help with study. All up it ended up costing me a little over $100 AU. I looked around a lot and I think its at least as good as the $400+ units, possibly up there with the top rate units if you understand the nuclear theory and arduino code well enough to use it to its full potential.
Unfortunately I had a soldering mishap and killed the 5v regulator on mine not long after I turned it on. Which may have killed the atmega. Its an easy fix, Will cost many $20 to fix. I just haven’t got round to it. Fortunately I did get a few min to test some stuff. It did seem to work very well. But I didn't get any video to share.

There is also a simple way to make a particle counter using a Darlington transistor arrangement. Essentially one of the transistor  bases becomes an antenna, and various shielding materials can be used to narrow down the kind of charged particles its detecting.
This page will give you more info.
http://www.techlib.com/science/ion.html#Experimenters%20Chamber
I do feel this method is less than ideal because of the difficulty in identifying the source of any radiation detected. Its got to be better than not having a particle count though.

So once safety has been addressed. How do we actually know if we have changed an atom into a different atom? We would need to confirm what is present before the test and compare it to what we get after the test. If we get a bigger atom we can confirm fission. If we get a smaller atom fusion would likely be the answer. When this data is compared to the Geiger readings we can determine if its bees a hot or cold reaction. One of the most accepted methods is spectrometry. As each atom has a unique electron configuration, each element also produces a unique photon emission when the electrons are charged enough to change orbits. Usually the energy is fed to the sample in the form of a 405nm uv laser. Also available on ebay for very cheap. It may also be possible to test gases via a Transverse Electrical Amplification Laser. Which is reasonably easy to make for those familiar with High Voltage.

There are a number of ways to make a simple spectroscope From a cereal box and a CD, for use with the naked eye or a still camera. Through to a web-cam version which can be built for around $15. You then use free open source online software to process the data you captured and get a proper emission graph.
These links should get you started. Googling "DIY Spectrometer" or "DIY Spectroscope" will get you a ton of useful results as well.
CD Spectrometer
https://www.cs.cmu.edu/~zhuxj/astro/html/spectrometer.html
Public labs Spectrometer project.
http://publiclab.org/wiki/dsk
Which is used in conjunction with the spectral workbench open source software. There is even a web client. (Use the drop down in top left to upload an image!)
http://spectralworkbench.org/


I think these two devices is the absolute minimum requirement to be able to do any kind of LENR study. Fortunately its not to expensive to DIY both devices. An added bonus is that during the DIY process its likely the experimenters understanding of the nuclear/atomic physics will improve. Further improving the quality of the testing.

If you don’t have this basic test kit. You have no idea if any nuclear reaction has taken place, nor if its a hot or cold one. I see it again and again on youtube. Every time I am left wondering what the person was hoping to demonstrate. I might as well be watching a video of someone testing 9v battery’s on their tong and giving performance rating for the different brands. Except most of the LENR videos don’t even have a control, so there would be nothing to compare to....


As you may be guessing by now. I have been looking into LENR for some time. Its a field I really want to explore further. Its also a very challenging field to study. It will be good to have some more good minds looking at and testing what’s out there. Once we can confirm a nuclear reaction has taken place then its time to develop further tests to confirm if its hot or cold. The we can move on to testing the energy involved to see if there is excess energy present, and to work out a way to harvest said energy. But first we need to concentrate on identifying the reaction's that are taking place.


Hopefully we will get to see you take this further with some better test gear and parameters established.




Diadon

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #10, on June 27th, 2015, 05:55 PM »
Thanks Mongrel Shark and welcome.
That is some golden information on safety and test equipment. I think I will try to get an arduino shield and purchase a scintillation crystal sensor. I believe that is whats usually used for accurate radiation detection. As for the specrtoscope. That is a great idea and after I can design a good hermetically sealed reactor and be able to take calorimetry data. I will start working on that as well. That is the idea in the long run. I would like to prove without a shadow of a doubt there is something going on here... It seems that has already been proven a a number of times though, so not sure when we switch from trying to prove something, to making it functional for everyone? Thanks a ton for the information, I am in the process of learning my micro-controller.
Also, I have done a visual test and I have something interesting to share. I need to repeat it a few times before it is certain. I have gotten the NiTi wire so molten it drips to the bottom of my vessel. Visually, the metal looks different.... That is not as fantastic, what is very interesting is it has become magnetic?
Anyways, fantastic advice and I look forward to any more ideas or explorations you are working on.
Talk to you later :)

Matt Watts

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #11, on June 27th, 2015, 09:27 PM »
Quote from Diadon on June 27th, 2015, 02:45 PM
You have any links so I can take a quick read through of his work?
Best start with this:
http://www.treurniet.ca/Smith/TOC.htm

There are more and you'll run into them as you go along if you still have interest.

benkomisar

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #12, on June 28th, 2015, 06:14 PM »
Hello Mongrel Shark, Diadon, and everyone else.

Right off the bat, I am here to say Diadon, myself, and others are working on creating a relatively, simple and cheap Arduino based data-logging code program and parts list.
I personally am more interested in the not spark style LENR process.
In the next weeks I will be doing long run-time, low-power electrolysis using Palladium Cathode and some other type of inert/conductive material as the anode.. I will be using KOH and NaOH as my electrolyte...

We will be using the arduino to analyze Power In vs Power Out (represented as Joules) and graphing all the data.

This forum is a good spot for us and anyone else who really is interested in this topic to be able to share data and learn openly from one another.

I agree with Mongrel Shark about the radiation detector, it is on my list as an essential sensor, eventually we will be able to graph radiation spikes against Power Input and Heat (Joules).

This is a long term project and I am glad this forum exists to be able to share information in a solid way.

I personally am more concerned with finding a way (through material science techniques) of creating a sustained cold fusion/LENR reaction. .. As for the theory as to why it works or how, well, it would just be speculation on my part.

Cheers to this forum and here is to an exciting long term exploration into what (for me) is one of the most fascinating and promising areas in Alternative Energy Science...

I cannot wait to be logging data and making cool graphs, I have many components coming in the mail

Peace,
Ben

MongrelShark

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #13, on June 28th, 2015, 06:54 PM »
Already been done? I am aware of some hot fusion devices. No cold fusion though. (Hot and cold in the radioactive sense)

If it has been done some peer replication would go a long way to brining it to peoples attention. As I said before I have seen hundreds of videos of underwater plasma, and not one of these has people doing any relevant measurements. Most of them seem to have missed the peer reviews where it was found that that method was not actually fusion but did exhibit some interesting non-nuclear effects?

I don’t get why its so shrouded in mystery? The name says it all. "Cold Fusion" or "low energy nuclear reaction". There are two trademarks you are looking for to indicate its happened. Low energy, or a cold reaction. So no increase in charged particle count. and Fusion or even any old nuclear reaction. So you need to use the spectrometer to identify atomic changes. Its not rocket science.

If you can confirm the first two. Then you can go on to look at energy in vs out.

So far no one seems to have been able to prove the first two points to a satisfactory degree. Mostly because people cant be bothered to get some simple and affordable test gear.

As far as quality of radiation meter. its not all that critical. A Geiger can measure background and monitor for increase. Thats all you need. If you do a few shielding tests you can even narrow down what type of charged particle its counting. You just need to have something sitting across the room that’s going to sound the fail alarm if radiation goes higher than in the presence of a smoke alarm. If you can do all that and still not be clear on what your experiment is doing, then maybe its time to use a fancy meter.

Ultimately it all comes down to the spectroscopy. As far as I know no one has been able to replicate any cold fusion experiment that shows evidence of a nuclear reaction when the result product has been analysed with spectroscopy.

Thats not to say that there isn't something going on with some of the examples I have seen. Simply that it does not meet the basic requirements for a low energy reaction and/or fusion. The few cases where fusion is confirmed, its been a hot reaction. With emission far above background.

One thing that stands out to me is the low power many of these experiments require to keep water boiling vigorously. I've seen video of people boiling a coffee cups worth of water for under 500w. AND they get excess HHO. There is something going on there, and I have a fair idea what. Its not fusion though. Could be an awesome hot water heater. If the HHO can be burnt off safely.

IMO if you want to look at cold fusion. Geiger (or other radiation sensor) and spectrometry are prerequisites. They are the first two and only two things you look at until you can confirm that a LENR has taken place. Then and only then is there room for further testing. If your not looking at results from these two tests. Its simply not LENR/Cold Fusion research. Its something else.

Diadon

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #14, on June 28th, 2015, 09:51 PM »
Yeah Mongrel,
There is a ton of documented examples, some I posted up on the top of this thread. The two common materials used is Pt to Pd with Deuterium water. The other is a Ni to Ni also using heavy water and some type of catalyst. There are however, a ton of different scholarly articles if you look into LENR. There is a pretty good summarized .pdf up top that some one put together if you are interested in a  cold fusion time line. I think an even better instrument I would choose over a Spectrometer would be an Atomic Microscope. You could see the atomic structure before hand and after the experiment takes place.  If we can be another voice that indeed confirms excess heat, and we can make this accessible educational and safely, it could have great promise in micro-generation of power. The key is to not focus on what we can't do, and rather focus on what we can. So that's what we are aiming too do. If that above .pdf doesn't quench your appetite. Here is some more emperical evidence from George Washington University
http://www.currentscience.ac.in/Volumes/108/04/0641.pdf
Trust me my friend, there is a ton of factual evidence that nature is telling us. Just look at the sun, whats happening there?  I don't think its from hot gases, I think its energetic density is much greater than any gas. That's all speculative of course, but these reactors are expressing something factual. That there is more heat out of the system then can be explained by chemical exothermal or electromotive forces. Understanding exactly what is happening is looking into atomic and sub-atomic particles. So it becomes very difficult since most of that is theoretical and yet to be 100% proven.

 Matt, that is some interesting stuff and seems similar to theory that a lot of people share. Whatever name you wish to call it, there seems to be a transition of energy we have yet to work out. I pulled up some of Smith's writings and he does seem to be pretty competent in expressing his theories in math and English. I love theory and poetry, but even more so now a day's,  I love to listen to what nature is saying. I will read some more of this http://www.rexresearch.com/smith/newsci~1.htm#3.2
It remains me a lot of Walter Russell as well, which is someone who interests me greatly. Thanks for turning me on to that literature, its appreciated. :)

  Ben and I are working at this together with who ever else would like to contribute. The non-plasma reactions, though boring visually, are of greater interest. However, perhaps there is still a plasma there, it just can't be detected by the human eye?  Its important for a species to understand what may seem invisible, so we me say in the darkest of nights.

 Good stuff guys, this will most likely be the place we post all our data since its an open-source and friendly enviroment. Until we talk again kind fellows
-Namaste

kenssurplus

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #15, on June 28th, 2015, 10:33 PM »
Hi All,

I don't know if any of you have visited here:
JLN Labs CFR index page
which contains this gem:
JLN labs transmutation of metal at low energies
Positive new elements generated  and identified by SEM (scanning electron microscope) which were not previously in the apparatus.
.
Energy production is good.  Excess hydrogen or hho is also good.  Anomalous heat can be put to use.  What really makes me sit up and take notice though, is the deposition of new elements both up and down the periodic chart from the tungsten. 

Anyway, as has been pointed out, there are ample reports by very well respected sources if you care to look into them. If not - then the old adage applies - " A man convinced against his will, is of the same oppinion still".




Diadon

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #16, on June 30th, 2015, 12:55 AM »
Yes kenssurplus, those are great links. JLN was one of the first people I saw do LENR experiments. Scanning electron microscope would be a great instrument to have as well. I have some samples I could send out that would be interesting to see under a SEM, if anybody has access to one. Ben and I are both waiting on some sensors to be delivered. I am still making deuterium, as its a very long process. Make take a break from it this week and do some more reactor design experiments. Have any of you guys looked at both the solar elemental abundance chart and the elemental nuclear stability chart? They are identical as Fe is the final element before Nuclear instability and the middle ground for solar abundance.  Just thought that is interesting and worth a glance.
 Take care and talk to you gentlemen soon.


nav

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #17, on June 30th, 2015, 08:40 AM »
You guys remind me of this video clip, which one of you has the time lapse camera? Wahahaha

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8J9sU2n5fIc

Diadon

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #18, on June 30th, 2015, 11:27 PM »
No way Nav, our special effects are way cooler lol ;) I am not sure how to interpret your comment.  Either you are saying we are chasing ghosts... or we don't need instrumentation to see the anomaly?

element 119

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #19, on July 1st, 2015, 01:25 AM »
"Using an SEM (scanning electron microscope), the presence of rhyenium, osmiun, gold, hafnium, thulium, erbium and ytterbium are found on the surface of the cathode. These elements were not previously in the apparatus."       http://jlnlabs.online.fr/cfr/lorio/index3.htm 


"Ceramic
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A ceramic is an inorganic, nonmetallic solid comprising metal, nonmetal or metalloid atoms primarily held in ionic and covalent bonds."            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceramic


Could the source of the elements found on the cathode have came from the ceramic ?

kenssurplus

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #20, on July 1st, 2015, 06:44 AM »Last edited on July 1st, 2015, 07:24 AM
Quote from element 119 on July 1st, 2015, 01:25 AM
"Using an SEM (scanning electron microscope), the presence of rhyenium, osmiun, gold, hafnium, thulium, erbium and ytterbium are found on the surface of the cathode. These elements were not previously in the apparatus."       http://jlnlabs.online.fr/cfr/lorio/index3.htm 


"Ceramic
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A ceramic is an inorganic, nonmetallic solid comprising metal, nonmetal or metalloid atoms primarily held in ionic and covalent bonds."            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceramic


Could the source of the elements found on the cathode have came from the ceramic ?
If so, you would expect to see marked degradation and an obvious change or area of breakdown in the ceramic to account for the amount of material on the cathode.  However,where you do see this degradation or obvious change or area of breakdown, is on the cathode which was made of pure tungsten (or at least they say so). Also the anode is tapered down to the tip (though not near as drastic as the cathode) - showing tungsten is being lost from its structure as well.   One thing that I notice is that the concentration of new element deposition is much higher near the tip where the plasma is hottest and most concentrated, and  fingers off in concentration the higher up into the ceramic you go.

I suppose to verify their claim, the solution could have been checked for the concentration of anomalous elements after the run, as well as residual nuclear decay signatures, and possibly the loss of KOH  concentrations.

 A close examination of the ceramic should have ruled this out quickly though.
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nav

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #21, on July 1st, 2015, 08:54 AM »
Quote from Diadon on June 30th, 2015, 11:27 PM
No way Nav, our special effects are way cooler lol ;) I am not sure how to interpret your comment.  Either you are saying we are chasing ghosts... or we don't need instrumentation to see the anomaly?
I'm saying that while you are busy trying to find transmuted elements with an electron microscope, I have seen things with an arc welder that would make your hair curl and you don't need any equipment to see the results. It's not as complicated as you think it is. The reference to the video is simple, you guys are like the guy describing the 7 hour duration of the toy car, I am the guy that opens the door and reveals an whole world of s h it you've never seen.
Turning carbon into iron by the Kilo and it ain't normal iron either, it doesn't rust. It has a lustre similar to Titanium but has the same mass as iron. Low volts, high amps in water and in air. Moved on to different elements now and building a table of which element transmutes to another element.
Tip: Get yourself some milky quartz crystals to play with, Silicone seems to act as a catalyst in the mix.

Lynx


Diadon

Re: "Cold Fusion" or LENR to the opensource community
« Reply #24, on July 2nd, 2015, 12:30 AM »
That's a great experiment Nav, thanks for sharing. Have you seen some of the simple experiments turning carbon magnetic? Perhaps it is a transmutation into Fe? Basically, you just throw some carbon particulate into a microwave and presto. Its shares similar properties of pyrolytic carbon when cleaved into a powder. Which is organized with mosiac crystals, which are kind of like broken single atom layer sheets on top of each other.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyrolytic_carbon