Gyroscopic Physics

~Russ

Gyroscopic Physics
« on March 31st, 2014, 11:31 AM »
something to look in to. also something i have been thinking about for quite some time. maybe i will get to test some stuff now :)

http://www.franmccabe.com/#!gyroscopics

watch some of those videos on his site.

~Russ
Re: Gyroscopic Physics
« Reply #2, on March 31st, 2014, 05:02 PM »
thanks for the reply!

do you happen to know if that copy right PDF can be reposed? if not we may need to remove it?

we had some problems with copyright stuff in the past...
any how thanks!

~Russ
Re: Gyroscopic Physics
« Reply #3, on March 31st, 2014, 06:04 PM »
cool thinks!

is there a link somewhere for that PDF you can post instead?

firepinto

Re: Gyroscopic Physics
« Reply #4, on March 31st, 2014, 07:38 PM »
I started a thread in the Tesla section too. :) 

http://open-source-energy.org/?topic=1825.0

This is some amazing stuff and fits well with Vortex math.  I love how he keeps saying it can self destruct.  I'm so going to print one and watch it tear it's self apart!  My gut feeling says energy that is hard to tame, and not hard to find, is what we need to make self loop.

Wonder if I can calibrate well enough to print some balanced flywheels.....

~Russ

Re: Gyroscopic Physics
« Reply #5, on March 31st, 2014, 08:34 PM »
Quote from firepinto on March 31st, 2014, 07:38 PM
Wonder if I can calibrate well enough to print some balanced flywheels.....
just remember that our prints wont stand up to those G forces :)

safety first :)

firepinto

Re: Gyroscopic Physics
« Reply #6, on April 1st, 2014, 04:24 AM »
Quote from ~Russ on March 31st, 2014, 08:34 PM
just remember that our prints wont stand up to those G forces :)

safety first :)
Yeah, I know I was just wishing I could print one instead of search all week for a source for metal ones. :D

Heuristicobfuscation

Re: Gyroscopic Physics
« Reply #7, on April 1st, 2014, 03:43 PM »
Something about  Gyros that are very atractive. it seems that when a certian speed is acheived inertia exerts a vector force and apears to lose weight.

Sort of what happens to water when we heat it up.

the water molecule expands, hydrogen becomes energetic  [Electrons spining faster] and the oxygen atom hitches a ride up to the clouds..

Re: Gyroscopic Physics
« Reply #8, on April 2nd, 2014, 08:26 AM »
Quote from Mogir Jason Rofick on April 1st, 2014, 08:13 PM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDUNV5TJDYI#

Was his model airplane engine powered unit getting lighter merely as a result of its consuming the fuel? Hmmm. Just something I noticed.
Good observation...Maybe to eliminate that possibility an electric motor would be more practical.

~Russ

Re: Gyroscopic Physics
« Reply #9, on April 2nd, 2014, 10:00 AM »
hummm interesting video. here's one that was posted a while back that ''m going to try at some point... its all sketched in my head lol


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHlAJ7vySC8#